Tempted by….Double Stacked Shelves: The Chestnut Man by Soren Sveistrup @dstackedshelves @MichaelJBooks @TheKilling #TheChestnutMan #bookbloggers #scandinoir #crimefiction

img_0301

One blustery October morning in a quiet Copenhagen suburb, the police make a terrible discovery. A young woman is found brutally murdered with one of her hands missing. Above her hangs a small doll made of chestnuts.

Ambitious young detective Naia Thulin is assigned the case. Her partner, Mark Hess, is a burned-out investigator who’s just been kicked out of Europol. They soon discover a mysterious piece of evidence on the chestnut man – evidence connecting it to a girl who went missing a year earlier and is presumed dead; the daughter of politician Rosa Hartung. But the man who confessed to her murder is already behind bars and the case long since closed.

Soon afterwards, a second woman is found murdered, along with another chestnut man. Thulin and Hess suspect that there’s a connection between the Hartung case and the murdered women. But what is it?

Thulin and Hess are racing against the clock, because it’s clear that the killer is on a mission that is far from over . . .

The Chestnut Man is the first novel by the creator of The Killing, Soren Sveistrup, and there has been a huge amount of buzz about the book in general, and amongst book bloggers in particular. I bought a copy of this book with a voucher I received as a competition prize, largely on the recommendation of my friend, Jill, in this post on her blog, Double Stacked Shelves.

I was really drawn to the cover of this book for starters, and Jill’s review gives an enticing description of the plot and characters that made me think that it would be a riveting and gripping read that I would really enjoy.

Jill has only been running her blog since September so it is very new but the reviews she has posted so far have been very detailed and insightful and I have very much enjoyed reading them. Her approach is quite different to my own, as I tend to be quite light-hearted and more flippant in my reviews, whilst Jill’s are very thoughtful and considered. I am quite envious of her ability to dig so deep, but ultimately I think the difference in each blogger’s method of reviewing gives us all a fascinating diversity of opinions to read on each book and means we get a well-rounded view of whether a book may be for us or not, so vive la difference, I say!

I may be a little biased as she is my friend and I know how lovely she is, but Jill’s blog is definitely worth a look for book lovers and it would be great if she could grow her following with a little support from the amazing blogging community that I have become part of over the last two years. She is definitely a great addition to the canon of book bloggers and I hope she sticks with it and her blog continues to grow.

If, upon reading her review, you would like to get your own copy of The Chestnut Man, it is available now in hardback and for Kindle, and in paperback on 5 September and you can get a copy here.

Tempted by….Jennifer – Tar Heel Reader: Boardwalk Summer by Meredith Jaeger @meredith_jaeger @tarheelreader @morrowpb @harpercollins #bookbloggers

img_0272

In this new novel from the USA Today bestselling author of The Dressmaker’s Dowry, two young women two generations apart discover the joy and heartbreak of following their dreams. Aspiring Hollywood actress Violet makes a shocking choice in 1940, and seventy years later, Mari sets out to discover what happened on that long ago summer.

Santa Cruz, Summer 1940: When auburn-haired Violet Harcourt is crowned Miss California on the boardwalk of her hometown, she knows she is one step closer to her cherished dream: a Hollywood screen test. But Violet’s victory comes with a price—discord in her seemingly perfect marriage—and she grapples with how much more she is willing to pay.

Summer 2007: Single mother Marisol Cruz lives with her parents in the charming beach cottage that belonged to her grandfather, Ricardo, once a famed performer on the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk. Drawn to the town’s local history and the quaint gazebo where her grandparents danced beneath the stars, Mari sells raffle tickets at the Beach Boardwalk Centennial Celebration, and meets Jason, a California transplant from Chicago.

When Mari discovers the obituary of Violet Harcourt, a beauty queen who died too young, she and Jason are sent on a journey together that will uncover her grandfather’s lifelong secret—his connection to Violet—a story of tragedy and courage that will forever transform them.

After a couple of weeks’ hiatus for the Christmas holidays, my traditional Monday feature Tempted by…is back. This is where I spotlight a book I have been enticed to buy for my own collection by a review written by one of my fellow bloggers.  This week I am showcasing Boardwalk Summer by Meredith Jaeger as featured in this post by Jennifer on her blog, Jennifer- Tar Heel Reader.

It was the summery and glamorous cover of this book that first caught my eye, with the girl in the old-fashioned bikini in the centre and the outline of Santa Monica Pier in the background. Regular readers will know that I can’t resist books set in the US, particularly by the coast. It is like travelling vicariously to my favourite destinations. Then I read on and was intrigued by the dual timeline story, which is always fun to read, and promise of a ‘light mystery’. I was intrigued enough to buy it, although I haven’t got round to reading it yet!

I first started reading Jennifer’s blog because of the tag line, ‘Reading under the light of a Carolina moon,’ which just threw up such an idyllic image for me and this is always how I imagine Jennifer reading, in a hammock (no idea why I imagine a hammock, she has never indicated that she even has such a thing) under the moon, caressed by a warm breeze. I love her chatty reviewing style, her book tastes are really interesting and she is very supportive of other bloggers. She also posts the most beautiful bookstagram images, of which I am very jealous! Please do check out her blog, I’m sure you’ll love it too.

If you would like to get your own copy of Boardwalk Summer, you can get a copy here.

 

 

Tempted by….Being Anne: Help The Witch by Tom Cox @cox_tom @Williams13Anne @unbounders #bookbloggers #bloggerlove #readingrecommendations #booklove #HelpTheWitch

IMG_0206 51G14JiX-7L._SX324_BO1,204,203,200_

Inspired by our native landscapes, saturated by the shadows beneath trees and behind doors, listening to the run of water and half-heard voices, Tom Cox s first collection of short stories is a series of evocative and unsettling trips into worlds previously visited by the likes of M. R. James and E. F. Benson.

Railway tunnels, the lanes and hills of the Peak District, family homes, old stones, shreds fluttering on barbed wire, night drawing in, something that might be an animal shifting on the other side of a hedge: Tom has drawn on his life-long love of weird fiction, folklore and nature s unregarded corners to write a collection of stories that will delight fans old and new, and leave them very uneasy about turning the reading lamp off.

I know this is usually a Monday feature but yesterday was impossible so I’m sharing it today instead. Surprise! A change is as good as a rest, they say, and I’m relaxing into the Christmas holidays.

Anyway, today on Tempted by…. I have Help The Witch by Tom Cox and the review which inspired me to buy it was this one written by Anne Williams on her blog, Being Anne. Anne is a hugely respected and inspirational book blogger, who also talks quite openly about things going on in her life in general so you really feel like you get to know her through her blog. I have been lucky enough to meet her in person and she is as lovely as she comes across on the blog. her reviews are always very detailed and honest about what works in a book and what doesn’t, so I completely trust them. No flannel here!

This was the main draw of the review for me, the pulling out of the positives and the negatives; the emphasis on what worked for her and what didn’t; the quirkiness of the stories. I do like a short story collection that you can dip in and out of when you are short on time or don’t have the brain space to embark on a longer literary journey and these sound like something out of the ordinary. I’m very drawn to something a bit different, although I’m not sure I will read them late at night while I am on my own! This book was published by Unbounders and I have found that their unique publishing model have produced some very diverse and interesting books this year, including some of my favourite reads, so I am looking forward to dipping in to this over Christmas.

If, after reading Anne’s review, you would like to get your own copy of this book, you can buy it here. And please do visit Anne’s wonderful blog, Being Anne, and get to know her, I know you’ll love her too.

 

Tempted by….Ronnie Turner: A House of Ghosts by W. C. Ryan @WilliamRyan_ @Ronnie_Turner #bookbloggers #bloggerlove #readingrecommendations #booklove #AHouseOfGhosts

IMG_0172

Winter 1917. As the First World War enters its most brutal phase, back home in England, everyone is seeking answers to the darkness that has seeped into their lives.

At Blackwater Abbey, on an island off the Devon coast, Lord Highmount has arranged a spiritualist gathering to contact his two sons who were lost in the conflict. But as his guests begin to arrive, it gradually becomes clear that each has something they would rather keep hidden. Then, when a storm descends on the island, the guests will find themselves trapped. Soon one of their number will die.

For Blackwater Abbey is haunted in more ways than one . . .

An unrelentingly gripping mystery packed with twists and turns, A House of Ghosts is the perfect chilling read this winter.

Today on my Tempted by…. feature I have A House of Ghosts by W. C. Ryan as featured by the lovely Ronnie Turner on her eponymously-named blog. Ronnie’s review, which you can find here, is short and sweet but totally enticing to the extent that I had to run out and grab a copy of the book straight after reading it.

If you go over and read the post, I put it to you that this is a masterclass of how to write a book review that teases out all of the salient points about the book without rambling on for hours (as my readers will know is something I am perpetually guilty of in my own reviews), all couched in beautiful language and delicious descriptions that can’t help but sell the book to you. This is what makes Ronnie one of my favourite bloggers to follow and I love reading her reviews and trust her recommendations.

If you have enjoyed reading this review, you’ll want to take a look at the rest of Ronnie’s blog where she has some lovely and unique features such as her book photography and cover designers talking about their work on book covers. You’ll also find links to her own writing and, I’m sure once you’ve seen what a way with words she has in her reviews, you’ll be keen to check out her novel Lies Between Us as well. If you would like to read my review of Ronnie’s book, you can find it here.

If you have been tempted, as I was, to buy a copy of his book, you can get it here.

Tempted by….Zooloo’s Book Diary: Cotton Tale by E. C. Fisher @ECFisherAuthor @zooloo2008 #bookbloggers #bloggerlove #readingrecommendations #booklove #CottonTale

IMG_0173

A private jet violently crash-lands on a deserted island. Captain Newton and his stewardess Rebecca are reluctantly forced to band together with the Vanderbach family as a means of survival.

They soon discover the island holds a dark secret the mainland has kept hidden since the 70s. Something monstrous was genetically engineered nearly forty years ago that even nature couldn’t destroy. Now it stalks the group as they venture further into the jungle in search of rescue and escape.

Can the group of misfit survivors manage to work together to find a way off the island? As the tension, suspense, and horror rise, they realize time is not on their side … the ravenous creations are drawing closer, and their appetite is insatiable.

Two firsts on the Tempted by…. feature today, as this is the first time I have featured an e-book purchase and also the first time I have included a novella rather than a full-length novel, so well done for standing out from the crowd, Zoe! Today I have Cotton Tale, a short horror story by E. C. Fisher.

This book was brought to my awareness by this review by the lovely Zoe over on her blog, Zooloos’ Book Diary. When one of your favourite bloggers starts a review with ‘Holy Mother of OMFG!’, it makes me think that this might be a story I want to pick up and take a look at. When I read the blurb, it sounded like it might be a cross between Lost and Stephen King’s Langoliers and Zoe obviously really enjoyed it, so I didn’t think I had much to lose for the cost of a short e-book. I don’t read enough horror, and this should be a quick one so I am looking forward to squeezing it in to a free hour. After reading Zoe’s review, I don’t think I will read it at bedtime when I’m on my own though!

For those of you who have not come across Zoe or her blog before, you must check her out, I promise you will absolutely adore her. She is always so enthusiastic about what she reads, and books in general, and she is an absolute dynamo with her content; there is always something new and fun and interesting to see on her blog. She is completely lovely, and a huge supporter of fellow bloggers and I love her to bits.

Watch out for my own review of this novella – coming as soon as I can find a gap in my blog tour schedule to fit it in. In the meantime, if you would like to grab a copy for yourself, you can download it here. It is free if you are a Kindle Unlimited subscriber.

Tempted by….Tales Before Bedtime: A Far Away Magic by Amy Wilson @AJ_Wils @panmacmillan @ShelleyFallows #bookbloggers #bloggerlove #readingrecommendations #booklove #AFarAwayMagic

IMG_0136

When Angel moves to a new school after the death of her parents, she isn’t interested in making friends. Until she meets Bavar – a strange boy, tall, awkward and desperate to remain unseen, but who seems to have a kind of magic about him. Everyone and everything within Bavar’s enchanted house is urging him to step up and protect the world from a magical rift through which monsters are travelling, the same monsters that killed Angel’s parents.

But Bavar doesn’t want to follow the path that’s been chosen for him – he wants to be normal; to disappear. Fighting one another as well as their fears, Angel and Bavar must find a way to repair the rift between the worlds, and themselves, before it’s too late . . .

Wow, these Mondays seem to be coming around quickly, which means it is time for the next in the ‘Tempted by….’ series, highlighting books I have been tempted to buy after reading reviews of them by my fellow bloggers.

Today I am showcasing A Far Away Magic by Amy Wilson, which I bought after reading this review by Shelley at Tales Before Bedtime. It was featured on the Tales Before Bedtime Juniors section of Shelley’s blog, as part of her  Summer Reading suggestions to keep kids occupied during the long holidays. My daughter loved Amy’s previous book, A Girl Called Owl, which I bought her for her birthday back in March, so I thought she might enjoy this too, but not until I’ve read it first!

My mother, when I ask her why she has never read Harry Potter, always responds with a question: “Why would I, as an adult, want to read a children’s book?” and I always reply, ‘Why wouldn’t you?” Children’s books contain some of the most beautiful, imaginative, innovative and exciting writing being produced today and anyone who thinks that the quality of writing for children is lesser than that in adult fiction is sorely mistaken. Plus, I think we all need a little magic and fantasy in our lives in these stressful times, to remind us what it was like to be uncynical; to be filled with wonder and imagination and optimism; to believe anything is possible for us. Why wouldn’t you want to read children’s books?

When I read Shelley’s review of this book, I thought it sounded like a book that might offer all of this magic and wonder and imagination. Shelley sums up the book in this quote: “Beautifully written, filled with magic, love and grief, this is a powerful novel with wonderful characters – I was left feeling a little of the magic had stayed behind with me.” Just what I am looking for when I pick up a book to provide me with a respite from the adult world for a time. I can’t wait to read this, and fully intend to steal back A Girl Called Owl from my daughter to read too. Actually, I’ll swap it for this one as fair exchange is no robbery.

Make sure you check out the full review of the book on Shelley’s blog, and have a further scout around while you are there. She has lots of interesting content, including some of her own writing which I am sure visitors will enjoy as much as I do. You can find Shelley’s blog here.

If you would like to get your own copy of A Far Away Magic, you can buy the book here. Amy Wilson’s new book, Snowglobe, is also out now.

Tempted by….I Should Read That: Sawkill Girls by Claire Legrand @clairelegrand @HarperCollins @IShouldReadThat #bookbloggers #bloggerlove #readingrecommendations #booklove #SawkillGirls

IMG_0118

Who are the Sawkill Girls?

Marion: The newbie. Awkward and plain, steady and dependable. Weighed down by tragedy and hungry for love she’s sure she’ll never find.

Zoey: The pariah. Luckless and lonely, hurting but hiding it. Aching with grief and dreaming of vanished girls. Maybe she’s broken—or maybe everyone else is.

Val: The queen bee. Gorgeous and privileged, ruthless and regal. Words like silk and eyes like knives; a heart made of secrets and a mouth full of lies.

Their stories come together on the island of Sawkill Rock, where gleaming horses graze in rolling pastures and cold waves crash against black cliffs. Where kids whisper the legend of an insidious monster at parties and around campfires. Where girls have been disappearing for decades, stolen away by a ravenous evil no one has dared to fight…until now.

Continuing my series spotlighting fabulous fellow book bloggers who have enticed me to buy books on the back of their reviews, today we have Sawkill Girls by Claire Legrand, as featured in this blog post by Justine on her wonderful blog, I Should Read That.

I really enjoy reading Justine’s reviews as she tends to read very different books to the ones I normally choose, so her blog opens up some different options to me and I am very keen to widen my reading horizons based on the recommendations of other bloggers whose opinions I trust. Justine is refreshingly honest in her reviews but always constructive and I respect her opinions.

When I read the review for this book, the first thing that drew me to it was the very striking cover art which I just love (we all know what a sucker I am for an attractive cover!). I was then intrigued by the description of the book as a mixture of Young Adult and horror. I don’t read a huge amount of either, so I thought this was a book that would be something different to break up my usual genre choices, and Justine’s description of the writing led me to believe it was a book I would enjoy. Although there were some negatives in the review, these actually made me want to read the book even more, to see if I could spot which aspects Justine is referring to her in her review and whether I agree with her.

I am looking forward to getting around to the book soon. If you would like to get your own copy of Sawkill Girls, you can find it here.

Make sure you check out Justine’s wonderful blog here. I love her tag line – ‘Books, cats, nonsense.’ Pretty much all you need for contentment!