Keeper of Secrets by Lynda Stacey #BookReview #BlogTour (@LyndaStacey) @RubyFiction @RaRaResources #RachelsRandomResources #KeeperOfSecrets

Keeper of Secrets

I’m thrilled to be taking part today in the blog tour for the new book by Lynda Stacey, Keeper of Secrets. My thanks to Rachel Gilbey of Rachel’s Random Resources for my place on the tour and to the publisher for my digital copy of the book, which i have reviewed honestly and impartially.

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Should some secrets stay buried?

For as long as Cassie Hunt can remember her Aunt Aggie has spoken about the forgotten world that exists just below their feet, in the tunnels and catacombs of the Sand House. The story is what inspired Cassie to become an archaeologist. 

But Aggie has a secret that she’s buried as deep as the tunnels and when excavation work begins on the site, Cassie is the only one who can help her keep it. With the assistance of her old university friend, Noah Flanagan, she puts into action a plan to honour Aggie’s wishes. 

It seems the deeper Noah and Cassie dig, the more shocking the secrets uncovered – and danger is never far away, both above and below the ground …

I was really looking forward to reading this book from the moment the author first told me about it, because it is based around a bit of history of my home town that I had no idea about. Sometimes a book which I am so highly anticipating can fall a little flat in reality, but this one did not disappoint in the execution.

Th author has created a really compelling narrative here, which is all the more fascinating for being built around a piece of lost South Yorkshire history. Since Lynda first talked to me about it, I have done a lot more reading about the Victorian Sand House, and the author has done a marvellous job of building a compelling story around the uncovering of this lost marvel, so I am sure anyone picking up the book will be as fascinated by the whole idea as I was and will want to learn more about it afterwards.

The story itself is totally gripping. I was hooked from the beginning and raced through the novel in two days, desperate to find out what was going to happen. The atmosphere is dark, forbidding, claustrophobic, it reveals a side of my home town that is unfamiliar to me, which is always exciting, and I was riveted by trying to piece together my knowledge of Doncaster with the locations in the book, but I am sure anyone who isn’t familiar with the locale will be equally drawn in by the tension and darkness of the setting, although it may not do much for the appeal of Doncaster to tourists! (It’s a great place, do visit us, we aren’t all crazy!)

Lynda has created some very sympathetic characters to carry the story. I loved the relationship between Cassie, her sister and her Aunt Aggie, and you could not help but be moved by the plight of the girls, and their aunt and their sad, individual histories. The romance in the book was also beautifully unveiled, but it was really the relationship between the girls and their aunt, and what they were prepared to do for each other that made the book for me.

I loved the contrast between the light and openness and carefree descriptions of Cassie in Italy, and the dark, oppressive tension of her life back in Doncaster, and the way the plot of the book began and ended gave a wonderfully rounded narrative. This is my favourite book of Lynda’s yet, and as an author you can see she is getting stronger and stronger. Wonderfully accomplished, I highly recommend it.

Keeper of Secrets is out now and you can buy a copy here.

To read some alternative opinions on the book, make sure you follow the rest of the tour:

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About the Author

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Lynda is a wife, step-mother and grandmother who grew up in the mining village of Bentley, Doncaster, in South Yorkshire..

She is currently the Sales Director of a stationery, office supplies and office furniture company in Doncaster, where she has worked for the past 28 years. Prior to this she’d also been a nurse, a model, an emergency first response instructor and a PADI Scuba Diving Instructor … and yes, she was crazy enough to dive in the sea with sharks, without a cage. 

Following a car accident in 2008, Lynda was left with limited mobility in her right arm. Unable to dive or teach anymore, she turned to her love of writing, a hobby she’d followed avidly since being a teenager.

Her own life story, along with varied career choices, helps Lynda to create stories of romantic suspense, with challenging and unpredictable plots, along with (as in all romances) very happy endings.

She lives in a small rural hamlet near Doncaster, with her ‘hero at home husband’, Haydn, whom she’s been happily married to for over 20 years.

Lynda joined the Romantic Novelists’ Association in 2014 under the umbrella of the New Writers’ Scheme and in 2015 her debut novel House of Secrets won Choc Lit’s Search for a Star competition. Lynda writes for both Choc Lit and Ruby Fiction.

Connect with Lynda:

Website: http://www.lyndastacey.co.uk

Facebook: Lynda Stacey Author

Twitter: @LyndaStacey

Instagram: @lynda.stacey

Violet by S J I Holliday #BookReview #BlogTour (@SJIHolliday) @OrendaBooks @annecater #RandomThingsTours #TrainNoir #Violet

Violet Jacket

Carrie’s best friend has an accident and can no longer make the round-the-world trip they’d planned together, so Carrie decides to go it alone.

Violet is also travelling alone, after splitting up with her boyfriend in Thailand. She is desperate for a ticket on the Trans-Siberian Express, but there is nothing available.

When the two women meet in a Beijing Hotel, Carrie makes the impulsive decision to invite Violet to take her best friend’s place.

Thrown together in a strange country, and the cramped cabin of the train, the women soon form a bond. But as the journey continues, through Mongolia and into Russia, things start to unravel – because one of these women is not who she claims to be…

It’s always a thrill to be on a tour for a new Orenda title, so I’m delighted to be taking part in this one today for Violet by SJI Holliday. Huge thanks to Anne Cater of Random Things Tours for inviting me to take part and to the publisher for my digital copy of the book, which I have reviewed honestly and impartially.

This is my first book by Susi Holliday, although I have had The Lingeringer, lingering on my TBR since last year. After reading this book, I will definitely be bumping that one to the top of the pile. This book grabbed me by the throat, gave me a good shake and refused to put me down until I reached the very last page, and I was practically holding my breath throughout the whole experience. This is one of those books that results in book lovers being accused of being anti-social by non-readers, because it is almost impossible to pull your eyes, or your thoughts, away from the plot.

It has every element that you would want to see in a superior psychological thriller. Unreliable characters driving the plot so you don’t know who is telling the truth, who is lying or what you can believe? Check. Excrustiating tension between the main characters that almost makes you want to scream in agony? Check. Dark and twisty plot that you can’t possibly work out until the very last chapter, and even then takes you somewhere you weren’t anticipating? Check. Riveting and original premise unlike anything you’ve seen before that takes you to new and exciting places? Double check.

Every element is present and correct, but the author has taken them and shaken them up, then put them back together in a book that is unlike anything you will have read before and is really fresh and exciting for us prolific readers who may have become over-familiar and a little jaded with the genre. This is one of the best examples I have read this year of a psychological thriller, and I absolutely loved it.

The stand out joy of this book for me was the setting, a journey on the Trans-Siberian Express. Any regular readers of the blog will know that I am a travel junkie, and this journey is one of those bucket list trips that we dream of taking but probably never will. Well, this author did, and she has shared the experience vividly with the readers through the pages of this novel so you almost feel like you are having the experience alongside her (although I hope Susi’s trip took less of a noir turn than that of her characters!). I love to read literature focused around travel, and it was a particular delight to read on that takes a detour from the familiar, picture-perfect, sunny locations to a place altogether more remote, more alien and, hence, more threatening which provided the perfect backdrop for the story.

The characters in the book also fit the non-standard pattern. We have a couple of young backpackers on the seemingly typical ‘gap year’ adventure. But these are not the shiny, happy, glowing teens we are often presented with, but the much more realistic selfish, grubby, hedonistic and often unpleasant world wanderers, and their adventures are equally torrid to behold. This is much more ‘The Beach’ than ‘Love Island,’ and all the more interesting and authentic to read about because of it.

Reading this book was a bit like riding one of those really terrifying theme park rides that you make yourself go on, even though you aren’t quite sure you want to. You buckle in, still having second thoughts, but it’s too late and you are off. Your heart is in your mouth from the beginning, you aren’t quite sure what is coming or when, you can’t catch your breath, and each spin and drop is equal parts excruciating and exhilarating. It is only when you get to the end that you whoop with joy at how much you enjoyed it, and you can’t wait for another ride, even while your pulse is still racing and you are trying to come back down to earth. Everything you could wish for. But yourself a ticket, you’ll have the ride of your life.

Violet is out now in ebook format and will be released in paperback on 14 November, and you can get your copy here.

Please make sure you do check out some of the reviews from the other fabulous bloggers taking part in the tour, as detailed on the poster below:

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About the Author

Susi author photo

S.J.I. (Susi) Holliday is a scientist, writing coach and the bestselling author of five crime novels, including the Banktoun Trilogy (Black Wood, Willow Walk and The Damselfly), the festive chiller The Deaths of December and her creepy Gothic psychological thriller The Lingering. Her short story ‘Home From Home’ was published in Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine and shortlisted for the CWA Margery Allingham Prize.

Encapsulating her love of travel and claustrophobic settings, her latest novel, Violet, explores toxic friendships and the perils of talking to strangers, as well as drawing on her own journey on the Trans-Siberian Express over 10 years ago. All of her novels have been UK ebook number-one bestsellers.

Susi was born and raised in Scotland and now divides her time between Edinburgh, London and as many other exciting places that she can fit in.

Connect with Susi:

Website: http://sjiholliday.com

Facebook: SJI Holliday

Twitter: @SJIHolliday

Instagram: @susijholliday

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Kult by Stefan Malmstrom #BookReview #BlogTour (@kpstefan) @silvertailbooks @BOTBSPublicity #Kult

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THE PAST WILL NEVER LET YOU GO…

When a four-year-old girl and her father are found dead in the Swedish city of Karlskrona, the police quickly conclude it was a murder-suicide, a tragedy requiring no further investigation.

But Luke Bergmann, a reformed criminal still haunted by his violent past, believes they are wrong. The dead man, Viktor, was his best friend, and Luke knows he would never commit such a horrific crime.

When more bodies turn up, Luke is certain the same killer has struck again. Alone, he embarks on an investigation which reaches back through decades to his friend’s involvement with a sinister cult and dark secrets are exposed as Luke struggles to keep his own long-buried demons hidden away.

And when Luke finds himself in a killer’s sights, his search for the truth becomes the fight of his life.

Can Luke get justice for Viktor and his daughter and prove his best friend was not a murderer, or will the shadows of the past overwhelm him?

Happily taking my turn on the blog tour today for Kult by Stefan Malmstrom. My thanks to Sarah Hardy of Books On The Bright Side Publicity for inviting me to take part and to the author and publisher for my digital copy of the book, which I have reviewed honestly and impartially.

This is a really fascinating, if very dark, read that stood out because it was partially based on the author’s own experiences as a young man with Scientology, which leant the story an extra level of authenticity.

I don’t think I am alone in finding cults a compelling subject. The idea that people can be influenced into believing the most extraordinary things that seem totally bizarre to the rest of us, to the extent that they are prepared to distance themselves from their family and friends, devote their lives and money to the cause and enact the most extreme forms of behaviour, including murder, is a topic I find riveting. I have read quite a lot of non-fiction on the subject of cults, and also enjoy fiction books that have this as a central subject matter. The Girls by Emma Cline was a recent novel based around a cult that was very popular, but the attraction of reading a book about possibly the world’s most famous cult, Scientology, by someone who was actually a member was too good an opportunity to miss and this book did not disappoint in any way.

The book is cleverly constructed with three story threads running through it that start off seemingly separate but are gradually drawn together as we go throughout the book until it forms a complete picture at the denouement. One of the threads follows the story of a group of young people as they are enticed into the world of Scientology in a small town in Sweden in the early 1990s. The main protagonist of the book is, Luke, a not quite whiter-than-white American now living in Sweden, who discovers the apparent murder-suicide of his best friend and his friend’s young daughter. However, Luke refuses to believe that Viktor was capable of any such thing and, despite warnings from the police investigating the matter, is determined to discover the truth for himself. The third thread…well you need to read the book for yourself to find out how that weaves in.

This book is gripping, to say the least. I read it in a day and could not put it down. The construct of the book was extremely effective in keeping the reader turning the pages and trying to work out how the pieces fitted together. The characters were cleverly portrayed to make you either love them or loathe them, as appropriate, and they felt realistic and well-rounded. I thought Luke was a great character to carry the story and would be very keen to read further books featuring him. I have to warn readers that some aspects of this book involved extremely disturbing subject matter that some readers may find distressing, but this was not done in a gratuitous manner and was relevant to the story. I found the insight into Scientology the most fascinating part of the book, though. To gain such a glimpse into the secretive world of Scientology from someone who has been there, and hear first hand the kind of damage it can do, was riveting. The author gives us a note at the end regarding how much of the book is fact and how much is fiction and it was eye-opening to say the least.

This is a dark, gripping and tense thriller with a fascinating back story and I would highly recommend it to anyone who enjoys a bleak but enthralling read.

Kult is out now and you can buy a copy here.

Make sure you check out the other reviews posted by my marvellous fellow bloggers on the tour:

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About the Author

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Stefan Malmström is a former news journalist who has worked for Sveriges Radio and Swedish TV4. Today he works as a consultant, lecturer and author. At a young age, Stefan was manipulated into the Church of Scientology in Hässleholm, a small town in southern Sweden. KULT, his first book, is based on his experiences in the cult. Stefan lives in Karlskrona in Sweden with his family.

Connect with Stefan:
Facebook: Hjarntvattad
Twitter: @kpstefan
Instagram: @hjarntvattad.se

 

The Hive by Jane Holland #BookReview #BlogTour (@janeholland1) @RaRaResources #Giveaway #RachelsRandomResources #TheHive

The Hive

Delighted to be one of the blogs opening up the blog tour today for The Hive by Jane Holland. My thanks to Rachel Gilbey of Rachel’s Random Resources for my place on the tour and the author for my digital copy of the book, which I have reviewed honestly and impartially. Make sure you check out the giveaway detailed below the review.

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Scarred by fire from infancy, with a persistent stammer, Charlotte has always been in the shadow of her glamorous theatrical parents. So it’s a shock when her mother commits suicide.

Left to care for her sick father in the dark maze of her childhood home, Charlotte begins to unravel. First, there’s the mysterious arrival of a box of dead bees. Then buzzing noises in the attic. People are watching her. Listening to her.

Everyone thinks she’s losing her mind. But an old photo suggests another, more sinister possibility …

This is the first thriller I have read by Jane Holland but it definitely won’t be the last because this one was a gripping, chilling menace of a book that I simply could not put down.

Right from the opening pages, this book has a dark, oppressive feel that creeps insidiously off the page to wind itself around the mind of the reader and pull them in to the dark world that Charlotte inhabits. She arrives home from a trip to Moscow to find a scene of devastation at the home she shares with her aloof mother and a father who is increasingly lost in a world of his own, unable to help her. Scarred by an accident when young, living in isolation with her parents in an old rambling house, taking walks in the fascinating but morbid confines of Highgate Cemetery, her only light and support comes from her Russian boyfriend, Alex. But Charlotte can’t quite bring herself to believe than even the handsome Alexei is truly there for her, as he seems to have a dark past of his own.

The author does a fantastic job of making Charlotte a sympathetic character to carry us through this story. I really felt her isolation and desperation throughout the book, her insecurity and self-doubt, and her growing fear as events throughout the story get more and more strange and terrifying. The plot is very devious and twisted and I felt myself with an unexpected sense of desperation to find out what was going and and how it was going to end. I read the book almost in one sitting and felt unfeasibly annoyed when I had to put it down to carry out the mundane but necessary tasks of the day.

This is a book which walks an interesting tightrope between thriller and horror, and not something I would particularly pick up myself as a normal read. However, I was totally gripped from beginning to end, and found this a very rewarding reading experience which I would be very happy to repeat in the near future.

The Hive is out now and you can get a copy here.

To follow the rest of the tour, check out the stops as detailed on the poster below:

The Hive Full Tour Banner

Giveaway

To be in with a chance of winning a paperback copy of The Hive, click on the Rafflecopter link below (UK entries only):

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*Terms and Conditions –UK entries welcome.  Please enter using the Rafflecopter box above.  The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then Rachel’s Random Resources reserves the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over.  Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for fulfilment of the prize, after which time Rachel’s Random Resources will delete the data.  I am not responsible for despatch or delivery of the prize.

About the Author

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Jane Holland is a Gregory Award-winning poet and novelist. Her thriller GIRL NUMBER ONE hit #1 in the UK Kindle store in 2015, and again in 2018, catapulting her into a life of crime. She’s published dozens of novels with major publishing houses under various pseudonyms, including: Beth Good, Victoria Lamb, Elizabeth Moss, Hannah Coates, and JJ Holland, and also self-publishes.

Connect with Jane:

Facebook: Jane Holland Author

Twitter: @janeholland1

Call Me Star Girl by Louise Beech #BookReview #BlogTour (@LouiseWriter) @OrendaBooks @annecater #RandomThingsTours #CallMeStarGirl

Call Me Star Girl Cover

Stirring up secrets can be deadly … especially if they’re yours…

Pregnant Victoria Valbon was brutally murdered in an alley three weeks ago – and her killer hasn’t been caught.

Tonight is Stella McKeever’s final radio show. The theme is secrets. You tell her yours, and she’ll share some of hers.

Stella might tell you about Tom, a boyfriend who likes to play games, about the mother who abandoned her, now back after fourteen years. She might tell you about the perfume bottle with the star-shaped stopper, or about her father …

What Stella really wants to know is more about the mysterious man calling the station … who says he knows who killed Victoria, and has proof.

Tonight is the night for secrets, and Stella wants to know everything…

With echoes of the Play Misty for Me, Call Me Star Girl is a taut, emotive and all-consuming psychological thriller that plays on our deepest fears, providing a stark reminder that stirring up dark secrets from the past can be deadly…

I am so thrilled to be taking my turn today on the blog tour for Call Me Star Girl by Louise Beech. My thanks to Anne Cater of Random Things Tours for inviting me to take part and to Orenda Books for my digital copy of the book, which I have reviewed honestly and impartially.

I am struggling to gather adequate words to express my thoughts about this book, mainly because it has raised such a tumult of thoughts and emotions in me that it is almost impossible to sort them into a coherent thread. I haven’t read anything quite like it.

This has been billed as Louise Beech’s first psychological thriller, and it is, but that description doesn’t really do justice to the complexity of ideas and themes running through the novel. The psychological thriller genre has become saturated over the past few years and some of us have become a little jaded with it, given the uneven quality of writing that has appeared. However, this is a book that rises to the top of the heap, as the cream always does, going beyond the mere shock twist trope that has become the almost tired signature of the genre, to offer such a labyrinth of concepts and issues that I am still mentally mining them for my ultimate conclusions, which may take a while. I think it may even need a second, third or fourth reading to fully wring the nuances from it. However, the review is due today, so I’ll do the best I can with my initial thoughts!

The book follows Stella, a woman working as a presenter on a late night radio show, who has become consumed by the mystery of the recent murder of a local woman not far from where she works. Stella carries her own set of hang ups, resulting from her abandonment by her mother years before, a mother who has recently returned and stirred up a hornet’s nest of emotions that need to be addressed. In addition, she has an intense relationship to contend with, and a mystery caller who is suggesting he knows the killer – but why is he calling Stella?

The book is written from dual viewpoints, those of Stella and her mother, Elizabeth, and it jumps through different timelines, present and in to the past when Elizabeth left Stella as a child. This works really well, as the past gradually informs the present, and we are shown the motives of both parties in their current and former behaviour, all of which begins slowly to shed light on the current mystery.

The book is intricately plotted and had me making wild guesses as to who was responsible for what, which changed rapidly from chapter to chapter as more information was revealed, the layers of action and motive gradually peeling back like the slowly opening petals of a rose, to reveal the perfectly formed pistil at the centre which holds the essence of the flower. By the end, I had tied myself in knots trying to guess what was at the heart of the story, but I hadn’t got close to the truth of it, when it was finally revealed.

The basic mystery of the plot is not the essence of the story, though, it is simply the skeleton on which Louise hangs the complicated musculature of the book, which is the relationship between Stella, her mother, her anonymous father and her partner, Tom. The dynamics of these relationships, and how the actions of one impact the feelings and behaviour of the others, is the meat of the book, and it is a rich and fascinating topic that Louise exploits fully to make the reader think. There are so many questions raised – nature versus nurture; the nature of the parent/child bond; at what point does an obsessive love become unhealthy; does there come point at which the actions of a person you love become unforgivable, and so many more. I am sure, if I go back to the book again, I will find more and more questions to ponder. This is not a book to be read once and discarded as having given all it can, this is a book that demands thought and attention and detailed consideration of its issues. It is a book that may well leave you with more questions than answers.

Louise’s writing is tight and emotive. The world she creates in this book is the dark, lonely hour of the night when people are pondering the murkiest parts of their souls and coming to unhappy conclusions. The deserted radio station in the quiet hours is intensely claustrophobic, and provides the perfect backdrop for the bleak questions raised by the plot. I found the book deeply unsettling and strained, nerves jangling in anticipation of the alarming facts of the murder about to be revealed. I found it almost impossible to drag myself away from the page and break the tension. The book sucked me into its vortex and held me in a pincer grip, desperate to get to the truth. Not a word is wasted, the twanging tension almost unbearable in its relentlessness as Louise pulls the reader through the story without a moment’s respite. It is a startling accomplishment and left me breathless and disorientated at the end.

This book is something quite special, an achievement that would, in a live arena, be worthy of a standing ovation. My most rewarding read of the year so far.

Call Me Star Girl is out now in ebook and will be published in paperback on 18 April and you can get a copy here.

To follow the rest of the tour for the book, make sure you check out the blogs listed below:

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About the Author

Louise Beech Author Photo

Louise Beech is an exceptional literary talent, whose debut novel How To Be Brave was a Guardian Readers’ Choice for 2015. The follow-up, The Mountain in My Shoe was shortlisted for Not the Booker Prize. Both of her previous books Maria in the Moon and The Lion Tamer Who Lost were widely reviewed, critically acclaimed and number-one bestsellers on Kindle. The Lion Tamer Who Lost was shortlisted for the RNA Most Popular Romantic Novel Award in 2019. Her short fiction has won the Glass Woman Prize, the Eric Hoffer Award for Prose, and the Aesthetica Creative Works competition, as well as shortlisting for the Bridport Prize twice. Louise lives with her husband on the outskirts of Hull, and loves her job as a Front of House Usher at Hull Truck Theatre, where her first play was performed in 2012.

Connect with Louise:

Website: https://louisebeech.co.uk

Facebook: Louise Beech

Twitter: @LouiseWriter

Instagram: @louisebeech13

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Disturbance by Marianne Kavanagh #BlogTour #GuestPost (@MarianneKav) @HodderBooks @ReadEatRetreat #Disturbance

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You don’t know what is going on in Sara’s house… or in her head.

Sara is lonely. No one talks to her – not even her bad-tempered workaholic husband or her two beloved sons. Her solace is her house, the biggest in the village, hidden away behind high hedges.

Then she strikes up a friendship with Katie, a college student living nearby, and a new world opens up. Her neighbours have been dying to get to know her, and they rush to help when Sara is devastated by a terrible accident.

But nothing is quite what it seems. And when new betrayals and shocking revelations disturb her peace, Sara realises she has no choice: she must act to protect the safety of those she loves.

I’m really thrilled to be taking part in the blog tour today for Disturbance by Marianne Kavanagh. My thanks to Kate Keehan at Hodder & Stoughton for asking me to be on the tour and for my copy of the book, which I will be reviewing on the blog at a later date.

For now, Marianne has very kindly agreed to be my guinea pig for a new feature I am considering introducing to the blog called 5W1H, where I will be asking authors a series of what, when, why, who, where and how questions about their writing process. Let’s see what Marianne made of my questions!

What inspired the plot for this book?

It’s difficult to answer this without giving too much away – Disturbance is full of twists and turns, and I hope you don’t realise what’s really going on until the very end of the book. But I was reading a lot of Patricia Highsmith, and thinking about how she makes you have sympathy for people who are behaving badly. I was also thinking about how the seven deadly sins are seen as normal pleasures these days – you’re encouraged to be full of pride, to envy other people, to laze about and eat too much. None of this is very apparent in the final novel – they were just ideas about good and evil that were running beneath the surface when I began.

 

When did you start writing this novel?

I just looked that up – August 2016.

 

Why do you choose Sara as the central character to carry the story?

It wasn’t Sara originally. In the first few drafts, everything was seen through Katie’s eyes. After about a year of struggling, I switched to Sara’s point of view. It was very hard, being inside Sara’s head, but the story came together for the first time, so it was the right decision.

 

Who is the first person who gets to read your work when you’ve finished it?

My husband Matt reads the very first draft, which is usually rubbish. Friends read later drafts, and my daughter Alice reads the final draft before I send it to my agent.

 

Where do you do most of your writing?

At home, in a room downstairs next to the kitchen. I used to find it really difficult to write if there was anyone in the house at all, because I got so distracted by noise. But nowadays I can blank out everything except for my tabby cat Mo wanting his dinner.

 

How did you set about writing the book? Are you a plotter or a pantser?

Usually I’m a plotter. I write a few key scenes to get going, and then plan the whole novel. But that didn’t happen with Disturbance – I kept having to throw it all away and start again. But maybe that’s the point. So much of writing is re-writing. Sometimes you have to do everything the wrong way before you can work out the right way.

Thank you, Marianne, for answering my questions. As an aspiring writer myself, i find glimpses into other author’s processes absolutely fascinating.

Disturbance is out now and you can buy a copy here.

Watch out for my review of the book coming soon but, if you can’t wait that long, please check out the other stops on the blog tour as detailed below to read some reviews from my fabulous fellow bloggers.

Disturbance Blog Tour Poster

About the Author

MK © Marzena Photography

Marianne Kavanagh is an author and journalist.

She has worked for Woman, the Tatler, the Sunday Telegraph magazine and British Marie Claire, and has contributed features to a wide variety of national newspapers, magazines and websites.

She has three grown-up children in their twenties – a journalist, a stand-up comic and a textiles designer.

She lives in south-east London with her husband Matt and two extraordinarily annoying cats.

Marianne’s first two novels have been translated into eight languages. Her third and fourth novels are published by Hodder & Stoughton – SHOULD YOU ASK ME is out now (hardback, paperback, ebook and audio) and DISTURBANCE will be published in March 2019.

Connect with Marianne:

Website: http://www.mariannekavanagh.com

Facebook: Marianne Kavanagh Writer

Twitter: @MarianneKav

Instagram: @mariannekavanaghwriter

 

She’s Mine by Claire Lewis #BlogTour #Extract (@CSLewisWrites) @Aria_Fiction @HoZ_Books #NetGalley #ShesMine

She's Mine

She was never mine to lose…

When Scarlett falls asleep on a Caribbean beach she awakes to her worst nightmare – Katie is gone. With all fingers pointed to her Scarlett must risk everything to clear her name.

As Scarlett begins to unravel the complicated past of Katie’s mother she begins to think there’s more to Katie’s disappearance than meets the eye. But who would want to steal a child? And how did no-one see anything on the small island?

I’m very happy to be kicking off the blog tour today for She’s Mine by Claire Lewis. My thanks to Victoria Joss at Head of Zeus/Aria for my copy of the book and for allowing me to share the below extract from the book with you.

Extract

That’s the truth, but not the whole truth. What I don’t reveal to her is an incident that took place in Christina’s bedroom the week before we flew out to the British Leeward Isles. I don’t disclose it because the incident doesn’t put me in a good light either! On Tuesdays, Katie does a full day at kindergarten so I have a little time to myself. I’ve got into the habit of using Christina’s en-suite, luxurious, walk-in power shower and expensive beauty products following the weekly hot yoga class that I go to after dropping off Katie. So last Tuesday, I had just finished my shower and wrapped myself in Christina’s bathrobe when I heard her bedroom door opening and then the sound of her antique roll top desk being unlocked.

I thought she must have come back early from work for some reason. There was nothing else for it but to come clean (literally!) and apologise for taking the liberty of using her bathroom without asking first. So I took off her bathrobe, draped a towel around me and opened the door. But it wasn’t Christina. It was Damien with his back to me, checking the contents of the desk. Caught in the act. Hearing the catch he started and turned in alarm. He reddened but quickly composed himself and went on the offensive. 

‘What a vision of beauty!’ he sneered as I stood there, my wet hair dripping onto the carpet. ‘I didn’t realise you and Christina were so intimate.’

‘And I didn’t realise you made a habit of going through her private papers!’ I snapped back. I know very well that the desk, an old family heirloom shipped over from the UK, is a strictly no-go area that she keeps locked at all times. He just laughed and then cool as a cucumber, he slipped some documents into a green cardboard file under his arm, locked the desk, pocketed the key and marched out of the room.

‘Just mind your own business and keep out of our affairs. Or you’ll be going the same way as the previous nanny,’ was his parting shot.

I understood this was no idle threat. Christina’s so possessive and distrustful that I knew if she got wind of this brush with Damien, she would imagine the worst and I’d be out of a job. So I said nothing to Christina in New York and I say nothing to the police officer now as she converses with me in the hotel bedroom.

I decide to keep my suspicions about Damien to myself – for now.

*

For something that was supposed to have been a ‘friendly chat’ the questioning is intense. After asking about my relations with Christina and Damien she embarks on a list of questions clearly aimed at working out a timeline for my movements this afternoon. What time did I arrive at the beach with Katie? Did I speak to anyone? Did anyone approach me or Katie? Did I notice anyone watching her? What time did I fall asleep? What time did I wake up? When did I become aware Katie was missing? What did I do next? Did I see anyone on the beach when I was looking for her? How long did I spend searching the beach before raising the alarm? What time did I tell Christina her little girl was missing? 

My head is pounding and I feel like a criminal by the time the family liaison officer finally puts her notepad away.

‘These questions are nothing to worry about,’ she assures me. ‘We just need to establish the timeline for the disappearance of the little girl.’ She ends the conversation by encouraging me to contact her ‘any time, any place’ if I need support or if I ‘remember’ anything else that may be relevant to the investigation. I half expect her to clap me in handcuffs and announce that she’s putting me under arrest, when at last she says that I’m at liberty to go.

*

In a waking nightmare, we struggle on through the grief-stricken hours of the day making calls, badgering the search team for any new scrap of information and giving interviews to reporters in the belief that getting Katie’s story out there might somehow help in her rescue.

The worst moment comes just after midnight when the operation is called to a halt. I collapse onto a chair in a quivering heap. All the strength has gone from my legs. Christina appears distraught, begging members of the police and emergency services to go on searching. 

‘There’s nothing more we can do tonight. We’ll resume at dawn. You should get some sleep,’ says the commander sternly. Holding our despair at bay and unable to contemplate the thought of sleep, we pace the beaches and the rocky headland for the next two hours, tripping over stones in the darkness, our steps lit only by the moon and stars in the cloudless black sky and the light from our mobile phones. 

I am lightheaded with exhaustion by the time I accompany Christina to her room in the early hours of the morning. We sit out on the balcony mesmerised by the sound of waves rolling on to sand. We are too tired to speak. I make tea and give her three sleeping tablets from a packet I find in her wash bag. Once the tablets take effect, I steer her to bed, her expression vacant and confused, as she lets me pull the covers over her. It’s not until I shut Christina’s door and go down the corridor to the room I’m sharing with Katie that it strikes me again. Where the fuck is Damien? I haven’t seen him all day, not since he handed me the cocktail at the pool. 

When I open the door, there is Katie’s blue bunny, propped up on her newly-made bed. The tears stream down my face. The bedtime story I was reading to her last night is still open at the page we got to when her eyes finally closed. It’s a beautifully illustrated copy of Peter Pan that Christina discovered in a quaint little bookshop called the Book Cellar, one of her favourite haunts for second-hand books. I glance down at the page. ‘The Mermaids’ Lagoon’ – Katie’s favourite chapter. She loves the colour illustrations of the mermaids diving in the waves. The doors to the balcony are open. I shiver in the sea breeze and step out through billowing curtains. 

I stand there for a few moments still clutching Katie’s bucket. 

Lost. Drowned.

If this extract has whetted your appetite to read the book, which I am sure it has, She’s Mine is out today and you can buy a copy here.

To follow the rest of the tour for alternative reviews and exciting articles, check out the poster below:

Blog Tour poster

About the Author

Claire S. Lewis

Claire Simone Lewis studied philosophy, French literature and international relations at the universities of Oxford and Cambridge before starting her career in aviation law with a City law firm and later as an in-house lawyer at Virgin Atlantic Airways.  More recently, she turned to writing psychological suspense, taking courses at the Faber Academy. She’s Mine is her first novel. Born in Paris, she’s bilingual and lives in Surrey with her family.

Connect with Claire:

Facebook: CS Lewis Writes

Twitter: @CSLewisWrites