Blog Tour: Ash Mountain by Helen Fitzgerald #BookReview

Ash Mountain Cover Image

Fran hates her hometown, and she thought she’d escaped. But her father is ill, and needs care. Her relationship is over, and she hates her dead-end job in the city, anyway.

She returns home to nurse her dying father, her distant teenage daughter in tow for the weekends. There, in the sleepy town of Ash Mountain, childhood memories prick at her fragile self-esteem, she falls in love for the first time, and her demanding dad tests her patience, all in the unbearable heat of an Australian summer.

As past friendships and rivalries are renewed, and new ones forged, Fran’s tumultuous home life is the least of her worries, when old crimes rear their heads and a devastating bushfire ravages the town and all of its inhabitants…

I am happy to be taking my part in the blog tour today to mark the paperback publication of Ash Mountain by Helen Fitzgerald. Thanks to Anne Cater of Random Things Tours for inviting me to take part, and to Karen Sullivan of Orenda Books for my digital copy, which I have reviewed honestly and impartially.

This is quite a difficult review to write, because I want to give a true reflection of how I felt about the book, whilst balancing that with external factors that I believe affected my reading of it. I have really struggled this last week emotionally for a variety of reasons and, unfortunately, I think this bled through to my reactions to this book. In fact, if I hadn’t been reading it for a blog tour, I probably would have set it to one side to come back to at another time, when I was in a different frame of mind. As it was, I ploughed on, but probably had a different feeling about the book than I would have if I’d come to it in a more upbeat frame of mind.

I’ve had a difficult week, and I think I really needed some escapist fiction, and this isn’t it. This is a dark, noir exploration of the dark undercurrents running through a small town, which are brought in to sharp focus when Fran returns to the place she hates to nurse her seriously ill father, just at a time where the town is threatened by a deadly bush fire. A lot of the topics explored in this book are extremely harrowing, and the author addresses them head on, without flinching and with huge emotional impact. This is something I normally love in a book, and I know it will be what draws a lot of readers to the novel. Rightly so, the novel deserves a wide readership because the writing is stunning, unfortunately I was emotionally unequipped to deal with it this week and it felt extremely bleak to me.

There is no doubt that the character development in this book is expertly done and works perfectly to draw the reader in and make the reader love or hate them. Again, this was part of the problem. I was TOO emotionally invested in the characters to deal with their struggles at the moment, and could feel their pain and distress. The book is a real rollercoaster of a ride emotionally, and the reader needs to be prepared for it. It packs a powerful emotional punch that I am sure would leave me fairly breathless at any time but completely floored me on this occasion.

The timeline jumps about between the day of the fire, the ten days or so leading up to it, and events that happened thirty years before when the main protagonist, Fran, was a teenager. At times I did find it a little hard to follow the timelines, because they were so disjointed, but this I know is deliberate and was done to add to the feeling of tension and anxiety which permeated the book. It just needs a level of concentration that was just a little of a strain for me at the moment, but I know I would take in my stride and truly appreciate for what it adds to the story at any other time.

This is a book that is powerful, emotional, challenging and full of tension from first page to last. The author is skilled at manipulating all of these elements and this is clear throughout. Unfortunately for me, she does this a little too well and I was just mentally in the wrong place for this book when I read it. I could see glimpses of the humour that I have seen other bloggers refer to within it, but just couldn’t appreciate it fully. Fabulous book, wrong time for me. I know it is one I will put aside and reread when I am in the right mindset for it. I would not want anyone else to be put off reading it though, because this is a wonderful book, and I know the issue was me and my emotional state at time of reading. More emotionally robust readers will love it, I have no doubt.

Ash Mountain is out as an ebook and audiobook, and will be published in paperback on 20 August and you can buy a copy here.

Make sure you check out the rest of the blogs taking part in the tour:

Ash Mountain PB BT Poster

About the Author

Helen Fitzgerald Author Pic 2

Helen FitzGerald is the bestselling author of ten adult and young adult thrillers, including The Donor (2011) and The Cry (2013), which was longlisted for the Theakstons Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year, and is now a major drama for BBC1. Her 2019 dark comedy thriller Worst Case Scenario was a Book of the Year in both The Guardian and Daily Telegraph. Helen worked as a criminal justice social worker for over fifteen years. She grew up in Victoria, Australia, and now lives in Glasgow with her husband.

Connect with Helen:
Twitter: @FitxHelen
random-thingstours-fb-header

Tempted By…. Audio Killed The Bookmark: Valentine by Elizabeth Wetmore

IMG_7466

Mercy is hard in a place like this. I wished him dead before I ever saw his face….

Mary Rose Whitehead isn’t looking for trouble – but when it shows up at her front door, she finds she can’t turn away. 

Corinne Shepherd, newly widowed, wants nothing more than to mind her own business and for everyone else to mind theirs. But when the town she has spent years rebelling against closes ranks she realises she is going to have to take a side. 

Debra Ann is motherless and lonely and in need of a friend. But in a place like Odessa, Texas, choosing who to trust can be a dangerous game. 

Gloria Ramírez, 14 years old and out of her depth, survives the brutality of one man only to face the indifference and prejudices of many. 

When justice is as slippery as oil and kindness becomes a hazardous act, sometimes courage is all we have to keep us alive.

This is the first time I have featured an audiobook on Tempted By…, but Berit of Audio Killed The Bookmark was so enthusiastic about the narrators of this book in her review of it that audio seemed the only way to go.

The blurb for this book doesn’t give much away, but it sounds intriguing, doesn’t it, and the book has had a lot of buzz about it. I mean, you only have to read Berit’s review, where she describes it as “authentic, profound, and beautiful” to know that it is a special debut, because whatever Berit says, I trust I am going to feel the same. I agree with her reviews about 99% of the time, so I knew this book was going to be worth the cost of an Audible credit.

Berit makes it sound like the book is totally immersive and evocative, which are things I am always drawn to in a novel. I love books set in the USA, but I read more set in the South Eastern states, so a book set in Texas will make for an invigorating change. It also sounds like it is extremely female-centric, something I also love, so I am really looking forward to listening to it soon. I am sure it will make the hours of housework and mucking out a little less tedious!

I love this blog, it is one I have been following for a long time. As I said previously, Berit’s thoughts seem to align to mine on most books that we have in common, and her reviews are always informative but succinct (something we do not have in common, as I tend to be quite long-winded, she has the advantage over me on this score!) I really love the way she sums up a book in emojis too, a quirky touch that I have fun figuring out. If you haven’t visited this blog before, please do pop over there and have a look around, I’m sure you’ll love it as much as I do. You can find it here.

And, if Berit’s review has tempted you to try Valentine by Elizabeth Wetmore for yourself, you can get it in all formats here.

 

Blog Tour: Hinton Hollow Death Trip by Will Carver #BookReview

Hinton Hollow Death Trip Cover

It’s a small story. A small town with small lives that you would never have heard about if none of this had happened.
Hinton Hollow. Population 5,120.
Little Henry Wallace was eight years old and one hundred miles from home before anyone talked to him. His mother placed him on a train with a label around his neck, asking for him to be kept safe for a week, kept away from Hinton Hollow.
Because something was coming.
Narrated by Evil itself, Hinton Hollow Death Trip recounts five days in the history of this small rural town, when darkness paid a visit and infected its residents. A visit that made them act in unnatural ways. Prodding at their insecurities. Nudging at their secrets and desires. Coaxing out the malevolence suppressed within them. Showing their true selves.
Making them cheat.
Making them steal.
Making them kill.
Detective Sergeant Pace had returned to his childhood home. To escape the things he had done in the city. To go back to something simple. But he was not alone. Evil had a plan.

I am very excited to be taking part today in the blog tour for Hinton Hollow Death Trip by Will Carver. Huge thanks to Anne Cater at Random Things Tours for asking me to take part in the tour and to Karen Sullivan at Orenda Books for my copy of the book, which I have reviewed honestly and impartially.

Have you ever wondered why makes people do the terrible things they sometimes do? You must have. When you heard the last horrendous news story about someone doing something unthinkable to another person, you must wonder what makes them tick? How  did they end up in this place? Is there something wrong with them? Are they being driven by an outside force? I know I have. I’ve often wondered how people can be so….evil. Well, in this book, Evil tells you himself how a group of residents in the small, ordinary town of Hinton Hollow come to the point where they commit the series of crimes that take place here over five, intense days.

Except, things are never that simple with a Will Carver novel, as you will know if you’ve ever read one before. And, if you haven’t, pick up this extraordinary book and prepare to have your mind bent. Actually, bent isn’t the right word, corkscrewed round and round on itself until you don’t know which way is up and which is down, and you meet yourself coming back is a more accurate description. This author is fiendish in the way he twists and turns the plot and the ideas, feeding in little clues and prompts to flip on its head the thing you thought he was trying to say and forcing you to look at it from another angle. Reading the book almost made me dizzy, and left me reeling with questions and conclusions. Spending a few hours inside his head is quite a trip in itself.

I’ve always had a bit of an issue with the idea that good and evil are somehow separate entities that infect human beings and make us act in a certain way. It seems a bit of a cop out to me, an excuse for people not to take responsibility for their own choices, because the actions we take are always a choice. Not always an easy choice, or a pleasant choice or a good choice, but a choice nonetheless and, despite Will Carver actually giving us Evil as a separate character in this book who claims to be nudging people in a certain direction, I get the feeling that this is a clever way of saying he agrees with me. Because, sometimes, the people here don’t take any nudging at all, and Evil is just playing to their innate desires, making their natural instincts a little easier to act on, removing some of their inhibitions, revealing their true souls. That is what is really scary. This is who we really are, he is showing us what we are capable of and, by his twisted logic, telling us that the fact society is embracing these baser instincts more and more freely, becoming selfish and uncaring and lascivious and greedy, we are bringing out the evil in the world, to shock us, show us where we are going wrong. Without us, he isn’t needed. If we choose to be good, he has less to do. Perversely, Evil is not the wicked one, we are.

Does this sound twisted enough for you? I told you this book was a brain pretzel of a novel. Honestly, you will strain a neurone trying to figure all this stuff out, the man is an evil genius. All of these complex ideas are packed into a book that is filled with fascinating and quirky characters and a plot with a shock around every corner. Just when you think you have it all figured out, he pulls the rug out from under you and delivers another scene you never saw coming. How the guy managed to pull this together without losing the plot (literally and metaphorically) is the most baffling thing of all to me. I know I could not do it, I am in awe of the skill it has taken to pull this thing together, and the originality of his ideas, the audacity with which he has delivered them blows my mind. This is a quite unbelievable achievement of a novel.

I know it won’t be for everyone. There are very graphic scenes in this book, both violent and sexual. Some of the acts that take place are of a very disturbing nature, but that is the fundamental point of the novel. This is not an easy read, both from the point of the imagery and because it is a book that takes brainwork to digest. You can’t coast through this read if you want to wring the meaning from it but, boy is it worth the effort. A book that will stay with you long after you’ve read it, will haunt your dreams, will sit up and make you really think, if you choose to. When was the last time that a 400-page novel gave you this much bang for your buck?

Hinton Hollow Death Trip is out now and you can buy a copy here.

Please make sure you visit some of the other fabulous blogs taking part of the tour for a variety of reviews:

FINAL Hinton Hollow BT Poster

About the Author

Will Carver Author pIc

Will Carver is the international bestselling author of the January David series. He spent his early years in Germany, but returned to the UK at age eleven, when his sporting career took off. He turned down a professional rugby contract to study theatre and television at King Alfred’s, Winchester, where he set up a successful theatre company.

He currently runs his own fitness and nutrition company, and lives in Reading with his two children.

Good Samaritans was book of the year in Guardian, Telegraph and Daily Express, and hit number one on the ebook charts.

Connect with Will:

Facebook: Will Carver Author

Twitter: @will_carver

Instagram: @will_carver

random-thingstours-fb-header

Tempted By…Traveling Sisters Book Reviews: Blackwood by Michael Farris Smith

IMG_6683

The small town of Red Bluff, Mississippi, has seen better days, but now seems stuck in a black-and-white photograph from days gone by. Unknowing, the town and its people are about to come alive again, awakening to nightmares, as ghostly whispers have begun to fill the night from the kudzu-covered valley that sits on the edge of town.

When a vagabond family appears on the outskirts, when twin boys and a woman go missing, disappearing beneath the vines, a man with his own twisted past struggles to untangle the secrets in the midst of the town trauma.

This is a landscape of fear and ghosts, of regret and violence. It is a landscape transformed by the kudzu vines that have enveloped the hills around it, swallowing homes, cars, rivers, and hiding terrible secrets deeper still. Blackwood is the evil in the woods, the wickedness that lurks in all of us.

Today’s Tempted By… is for a book that I bought following this review by Brenda of the Traveling Sisters Book Reviews blog, run by a trio of Canadian sisters. I often find that, being on a different continent, they review books that I might not come across on many UK book blogs, so their recommendations are a good way to inject some variety in to my reading. This book had already been raved about by the author, Sarah Knight, so once Brenda confirmed that she loved it too, I knew I simply had to get it. Plus, I just LOVE that cover.

The book I am talking about is Blackwood by Michael Farris Smith.

It is very hard to tell from the review, and from reading the book’s blurb, what genre of book this is. Is it a horror story? Supernatural? Romance? Crime? Thriller? A combination of all of them? This uncertainty is one of the things that drew me in, I have to say. I love the idea of going in to a book without really knowing what I am going to get.  And that mixture of emotions that Brenda describes – “a quiet feeling of bleakness, darkness and hope” – I am intrigued to know how this combination manifests itself in the story. It is a great skill to write a review that is so tempting without giving anything at all away!

You may have visited the Traveling Sisters Book Reviews blog without realising it, when it was known as Two Sisters Lost in a Coulee. If not, and you do take a look, you will find a friendly blog with a great mix of reviews in lots of different genres, author interviews and Q&AS, and plenty of other bookish stuff designed to keep bibliophiles delighted. You can find the blog here.

And, if you find yourself intrigued by the book after reading Brenda’s mysterious but glowing review, you can buy Blackwood in all formats, here.

Blog Tour: The Big Chill by Doug Johnstone #BookReview

The Big Chill Cover

Haunted by their past, the Skelf women are hoping for a quieter life. But running both a funeral directors’ and a private investigation business means trouble is never far away, and when a car crashes into the open grave at a funeral Dorothy is conducting, she can’t help looking into the dead driver’s shadowy life.

While Dorothy uncovers a dark truth at the heart of Edinburgh society, her daughter Jenny and granddaughter Hannah have their own struggles. Jenny’s ex-husband Craig is making plans that could shatter the Skelf women’s lives, and the increasingly obsessive Hannah has formed a friendship with an elderly professor that is fast turning deadly.

But something even more sinister emerges when a drumming student of Dorothy’s disappears, and suspicion falls on her parents. The Skelf women find themselves immersed in an unbearable darkness – but could the real threat be to themselves?

Delighted to be taking part in the blog tour for The Big Chill by Doug Johnstone today. Thanks to Anne Cater at Random Things Tours for including me on the tour and to Karen Sullivan at Orenda Books for my digital copy of the novel, which I have reviewed honestly and impartially.

This is the second book featuring the Skelf women, following on from A Dark Matterand I would recommend that you read that book before embarking on this one, because The Big Chill contains some spoilers for the first book. However, if that isn’t something that bothers you unduly, or you aren’t planning on reading the first book, The Big Chill works perfectly well as a standalone novel.

The book is told from the perspectives of, and in the voices of, three generations of Skelf women. Dorothy is the matriarch, running a funeral service and PI agency side by side, whilst trying to hold her family together in the aftermath of her husband’s death and the events of book one. Her daughter, Jenny, is embarking on a new relationship, whilst still coming to terms with her ex-husband being in prison. And Dorothy’s granddaughter, Hannah, is struggling with depression and anxiety following her father’s crimes. Each woman is battling her own demons, in her own way, but together they form a strong and fascinating unit.

As well as the lives of the three women, the author also presents us with a number of different mysteries to tussle with. Who was the homeless man killed in the car that crashes into one of Dorothy’s funerals? What has happened to Dorothy’s teenage drum student, missing from her parents’ house for several days? And what secret is Hannah’s professor hiding from his wife? Curious by nature and by profession, the Skelf women set about trying to get to the bottom of these puzzles, whilst exploring their own internal problems at the same time, so there is a lot for the reader to absorb.

The author paints the characters so vividly, that they are truly alive on the page. These are living, breathing, complex women who take no imagining to make believable, Doug has done all that work for you. I think Dorothy is my favourite, the Californian wild child, displaced to cold and rainy Edinburgh, still coming to terms with the fact that she is no longer young and drumming as a way to mindfulness. Cool doesn’t begin to cover it. She is one of those older women that we all aspire to be, and made me want to pick up a pair of drumsticks immediately. I absolutely loved her choice of music to drum to, too! She is definitely someone who is there for everyone else, putting the needs of all those she cares about before her own, but we get a glimpse under the surface to the turmoils she, herself, is experiencing, and hope that she may have found someone that she can share those with in the aftermath of widowhood. When I was younger, my mum always used to tell me that, no matter how old you get, you never feel any different inside. As I am not firmly ensconced in middle age myself, I understand what she meant, and Dorothy is a character who embodies this phenomenon to the full. I love her.

Hannah, at the other end of the scale, ponders her place in the universe and finds it small and insignificant, although its hard to tell whether this is a comfort or a cause for despair. She is seeing a therapist but, as a talented physics student, one gets the impression that she may be beyond the understanding of her counsellor. In their own way, all three women are pondering their place in the cosmos, trying to work out where they fit in after their lives have been shaken up and put down in a different place, a bit like an agitated snow globe, all their emotions and possibilities up in the air. The only thing holding them together in the maelstrom is the strength of their family bond and the certainty that, whatever else is happening, they can absolutely rely on each other.

This book is a gripping thriller, but it is also so much more. An exploration of family, of female strength, of ageing and death, relationships, community and where we fit in the world. There is so much depth and ideas to mine, but it is also pacy and darkly comic in places. In addition, Doug brings Edinburgh to life on the page. This is obviously a city he knows and loves, and that affection permeates every page of the book. I raced through the novel, loving every syllable, and I can’t wait for more. This writer has a natural talent and a keen eye and is someone that any fan of crime, thrillers or simply great writing should pick up.

The Big Chill is out now as an ebook and will be published in paperback on 20 August and you can get a copy here.

Make sure you follow the rest of the tour for this book:

The Big Chill BT Poster

About the Author

Doug Johnstone Author Pic

Doug Johnstone is the author of more ten novels, most recently Breakers (2019), which has been shortlisted for the McIlvanney Prize for Scottish Crime Novel of the Year and A Dark Matter (2020), which launched the Skelfs series. Several of his books have been bestsellers and award winners, and his work has been praised by the likes of Val McDermid, Irvine Welsh and Ian Rankin.

He’s taught creative writing and been writer in residence at various institutions – including a funeral home, which he drew on to write A Dark Matter – and has been an arts journalist for twenty years.

Doug is a songwriter and musician with five albums and three EPs released, and he plays drums for the Fun Lovin’ Crime Writers, a band of crime writers. He’s also player-manager of the Scotland Writers Football Club. He lives in Edinburgh.

Connect with Doug:

Website: https://dougjohnstone.com

Twitter: @doug_johnstone

Instagram: @writerdougj

random-thingstours-fb-header

Blog Tour: Sister by Kjell Ola Dahl; Translated by Don Bartlett #BookReview

Sister Cover Image

Oslo detective Frølich searches for the mysterious sister of a young female asylum seeker, but when people start to die, everything points to an old case and a series of events that someone will do anything to hide…

Suspended from duty, Detective Frølich is working as a private investigator, when his girlfriend’s colleague asks for his help with a female asylum seeker, who the authorities are about to deport. She claims to have a sister in Norway, and fears that returning to her home country will mean instant death.

Frølich quickly discovers the whereabouts of the young woman’s sister, but things become increasingly complex when she denies having a sibling, and Frølich is threatened off the case by the police. As the body count rises, it becomes clear that the answers lie in an old investigation, and the mysterious sister, who is now on the run…

Today I am posting my review for Sister by Kjell Ola Dahl, the latest in the Oslo Detectives series. My huge apologies to the author, publisher and tour organiser for the lateness of this review. I was unable to post on my scheduled date due to an accident, but I hope you enjoy it now. My thanks to Anne Cater at Random Things Tours for inviting me to review the book and to Karen Sullivan at Orenda Books for my digital copy of the book, which I have reviewed honestly and impartially.

This was my first introduction to the world of Detective Frolich, despite being the the fact that it is book eight in the series. However, it works perfectly as a standalone, although I would like to know more about Frolich’s back story, as he is a fascinating character. In this book, we meet Frolich as he is working as a private detective, having been suspended from the police, and is trying to find his footing in this new world and work out how to make a living. Despite this, he gets involved in a case that is set to be hugely unprofitable for him at the behest of his new girlfriend, and a woman who begs him to help a refugee she is working with. The fact he accepts gives us great insight into Frolich’s character and what drives him. It is a sense of justice and wanting to help people that is his biggest motivator, rather than money.

The book takes Frolich across the Norwegian landscape, from Oslo to more remote places, and I found the descriptions of the locations enticing, if a little bleak. It felt like there was a darkness seeping into every corner of this novel, not just the crime but the setting and the characters too. In fact, the word that really encapsulated the feel of the book for me was melancholy. There was a sadness seeping from the pages; from Frolich and his situation; from the plight of the subjects of the investigation; and from the very landscape itself. The references to unfortunate things that have happened in Norway may have contributed to this throughout, the book felt sad and a little hopeless.

This is largely due to the driving narrative behind the story, which is the problem of refugees in Norway and the desperate situations in which they find themselves. Fleeing from places of war and persecution, they risk a lot to reach countries they believe they may be safe, only to find that they may be in as much danger where they have arrived than the place they are left. Subject to prejudice and at risk of exploitation, they find they have not reached the nirvana they were hoping for. The book is a damning indictment of how Western societies are failing these vulnerable people, as well as an illuminating social commentary on the risks that they face at either end of their journey. A very modern and relevant story, as well as being a gripping thriller.

I was hooked o this book from start to finish, although I did find it a heart-rending and thought-provoking read. I just wanted to mention the skill in the translation of this novel from Norwegian. It was seamless and barely noticeable, which is the great skill in translating fiction, I was not distracted by the translation at all. Another great, new writer to me from the astonishing Orenda stable, I can’t wait to catch up on the instalments I have missed and see what is next. Intelligent writing.

Sister is out now and you can buy a copy here.

Please do make sure you check out the rest of the tour, as detailed below:

Sister BT Poster

About the Author

Kjell Author Pic

One of the fathers of the Nordic Noir genre, Kjell Ola Dahl was born in 1958 in Gjøvik. He made his debut in 1993, and has since published eleven novels, the most prominent of which is a series of police procedurals cum psychological thrillers featuring investigators Gunnarstranda and Frølich. In 2000 he won the Riverton Prize for The Last Fix and he won both the prestigious Brage and Riverton Prizes for The Courier in 2015. His work has been published in 14 countries, and he lives in Oslo.

Connect with Kjell:

Twitter: @ko_dahl

random-thingstours-fb-header

Blog Tour: Rabette Run by Nick Rippington #GuestPost

51i6-vT0MnL._SY346_

EMERSON RABETTE has a phobia about travelling on underground trains, so when he is involved in a car accident his worst nightmare is about to come true.

A middle-aged graphic designer and father of one, Emerson’s entire future depends on him reaching an important business meeting. Without an alternative method of transport, he has to confront his biggest fear.

Things immediately go wrong when Emerson’s Obsessive Compulsive Disorder kicks in and his fellow passengers become angry at the way he is acting. Thankfully a young woman called Winter comes to his rescue and agrees to help him reach his destination.

Once on the train, she thinks her job is done. But Emerson can’t help feeling he is being watched by his fellow passengers, including a soldier, a woman in a hat covered with artificial fruit and a man with a purple goatee beard.

Is it just his paranoia kicking in, or are they all out to get him?

And Winter is taken totally by surprise when Emerson takes flight after reading a message scrawled on the train’s interior.

It simply reads: ‘Run Rabette Run’

I am delighted to be taking part in the blog tour today for a unique book, Rabette Run by Nick Rippington and to be bringing you a fascinating Q & A feature with the author. My thanks to Sarah Hardy of Books On The Bright Side Publicity for inviting me to take part and to the author for answering the questions for this feature.

Question & Answer with Nick Rippington, author of Rabette Run

Where did the idea for Rabette Run come from?
Working shifts as a sports designer on a national newspaper in London I quite often have to catch the underground train home late at night. At times you might be the only one on the carriage and I remember spotting the odd item of graffiti and thinking, ‘What if there was my name scrawled on there, together with a warning?’ The ball got rolling from there and within a few weeks I had an idea of how it was going to go. As often in these cases, the more I wrote, the more the idea developed. I was also a big fan of the TV series Lost and was choked at how poor the ending was having watched 5 or 6 series. I had come up with an alternative ending and I won’t say any more other than I ran with the idea…
Any thoughts on who you could see playing Winter & Emerson if it went to the big screen?
I would love to see someone like Ed Norton playing Emerson, though he might be a bit too old now. He’s one of my favourite actors and I thought he did a wonderful job in Fight Club, which in some ways has a similar feel to it in that you aren’t sure what’s real and what’s fiction. If I was going for someone younger it would have to be Kit Harrington who played John Snow in Game of Thrones. Another Game of Thrones actress, Sophie Turner who played Sansa, would make the perfect Winter, though I also think Jodie Comer, who is terrific in Killing Eve, would do a great job.
Did you spend much time going underground on the tubes for research?
I’ve worked in London since I joined the News of the World in 2009 and even before then I spent a few years living there, so it’s pretty hard to avoid the Tube to be honest. I wonder how Emerson managed to do it for so long because, believe me, driving is not a pleasant experience in the smoke.
Rabette Run is quite different from your Boxer Boys series. What made you turn to psychological thrillers?
I thought that the Boxer Boys had run their course, for the moment anyway, and I had several other ideas popping up in my head. I first attempted to write this a long time ago as a project for the National Novel Writing Month – NaNoWriMo – so I’d already got 50,000 words down and it seemed logical to try to finish it off once Dying Seconds had been published. Rather than trying to weave my Boxer Boys characters into the series or, worse, make Emerson into a UK gangster type I just wanted to see how things would go if I attempted something different. I’m very happy with the way it worked out. I’m sure I’ll get the perfect storyline for another gangland tale in the future but for the moment I am taking a break. I interviewed the US thriller writer Karin Slaughter at the London Book Fair last year and she has managed to break away from her regular characters on occasion. It hasn’t hurt her as a writer. I know I’m not in that bracket but I think attempting something different can only help improve your writing. A past editor of mine said after reading Spark Out, a particularly gritty thriller, that some of the sections in it made her think I would make a great romance writer! Not yet…
What books and authors have you enjoyed reading over the last 12 months?
I’ve been doing quite a bit of research on another book so have been reading mainly factual books, but I am a massive fan of John Le Carre and a Delicate Truth didn’t disappoint. I love Angela Marsons’ Kim Stone series and also enjoyed The Child by Fiona Barton and Thirteen by Steve Cavanagh. I tend to find with all the Tube travel that audio books mean you can get through a lot more these days, very handy to relax and listen to someone reading when you’ve spent the whole day proofreading copy in front of a computer screen.
Can you tell us a bit about what you are currently working on?
I’m reluctant to say too much without giving away the ending – spoiler alert! – but let’s just say there is a serial killer involved!
Thanks for that fascinating insight into the inspiration for Rabette Run, Nick, and what is coming next.
If you would like to read Rabette Run for yourself, you can buy a copy here and to celebrate Nick’s blog tour my readers can get Rabette Run in digital format for the bargain knockdown price of 99p during the week April 7-14. What’s stopping you?
If you would like to read some extracts and reviews of the book, please do check out the rest of the stops on the blog tour as detailed below:
BLOG TOUR (7)
About the Author
IMG_2600

Nick Rippington is the award-winning author of the Boxer Boys series of gangland crime thrillers.

Based in London, UK, Nick was the last-ever Welsh Sports Editor of the now defunct News of The World, writing his debut release Crossing The Whitewash after being made redundant with just two days notice after Rupert Murdoch closed down Europe’s biggest-selling tabloid in 2011.

On holiday at the time, Nick was never allowed back in the building, investigators sealing off the area with crime scene tape and seizing his computer as they investigated the phone-hacking scandal, something which took place a decade before Nick joined the paper. His greatest fear, however, was that cops would uncover the secrets to his Fantasy Football selections.

Handed the contents of his desk in a black bin bag in a murky car park, deep throat style, Nick was at a crossroads – married just two years earlier and with a wife and 9-month-old baby to support.

With self-publishing booming, he hit on an idea for a UK gangland thriller taking place against the backdrop of the Rugby World Cup and in 2015 produced Crossing The Whitewash, which received an honourable mention in the genre category of the Writers’ Digest self-published eBook awards. Judges described it as “evocative, unique, unfailingly precise and often humorous”.

Follow-up novel Spark Out, a prequel set at the time of Margaret Thatcher and the Falklands War, received a Chill With A Book reader award and an IndieBRAG medallion from the prestigious website dedicated to Independent publishers and writers throughout the world. The novel was also awarded best cover of 2017 with Chill With A Book.

The third book in the Boxer Boys series Dying Seconds, a sequel to Crossing The Whitewash, was released in December 2018 and went to the top of the Amazon Contemporary Urban Fiction free charts during a giveaway period of five days. A digital box set, the Boxer Boys Collection, came out in September last year.

Now Nick, 60, is switching direction feeling that, for the moment, the Boxer Boys series has run its course. His latest novel, Rabette Run, will be released in the Spring and Nick says, ‘It is a gritty psychological thriller with twists and turns galore. Think Alice in Wonderland with tanks and guns.’

Married to Liz, When Nick isn’t writing he works as a back bench designer of sports pages on the Daily Star. He has two children – Jemma, 37, and Olivia, 9.

Connect with Nick:

Website: https://www.theripperfile.com

Facebook: Nick Rippington

Twitter: @nickripp

Instagram: @rippington

Pinterest: Nick Rippington

Blog Tour: Containment by Vanda Symon #BookReview

Containment Cover

Chaos reigns in the sleepy village of Aramoana on the New Zealand coast, when a series of shipping containers wash up on the beach and looting begins.

Detective Constable Sam Shephard experiences the desperation of the scavengers first-hand, and ends up in an ambulance, nursing her wounds and puzzling over an assault that left her assailant for dead.

What appears to be a clear-cut case of a cargo ship running aground soon takes a more sinister turn when a skull is found in the sand, and the body of a diver is pulled from the sea … a diver who didn’t die of drowning…

As first officer at the scene, Sam is handed the case, much to the displeasure of her superiors, and she must put together an increasingly confusing series of clues to get to the bottom of a mystery that may still have more victims…

I’m so delighted to be taking part today in the blog tour for Containment by Vanda Symon, the third book in the Sam Shepherd series. I loved the first two books, Overkill and The Ringmaster (you can find my reviews of those here and here.) and could not wait to read this one. My thanks to Anne Cater of Random Things Tours for offering me a place on the tour and to Karen Sullivan of Orenda Books for my digital copy of the book, which I have reviewed honestly and impartially.

Although this is the third instalment in the Sam Shepherd series, this book would work perfectly well as a standalone for anyone who is coming new to the novels. This book throws you straight in to the middle of the action and in to Sam’s distinctive world and character, as she finds herself immediately in the midst of an affray on a beach where locals are looting beached shipping containers after a wreck. Beaten, but coming back fighting, what at first seems like a minor issue of theft, spirals into something much more sinister as bodies begin to pile up, all linked to the wreck.

This author offers something new with every book, and this time we are confronted with the recovery and examination of a body dumped at sea (fascinating but fairly graphic and gruesome, steel your stomach), the law surrounding recovery of goods from wrecked cargo ships, the market in stolen valuables and the nefarious goings on of the local student population. All her books are packed with description and illuminating detail, meticulously researched and seamlessly stitched into the narrative until the setting and the world come to life for the reader through the text. At a time when we are all housebound, these are books that can take you to the other side of the world and immerse you in a totally different life for a few hours.

The books are well-paced, with short chapters that keep the momentum and new bits of evidence appear around every corner. In the same way a real investigation would unfold, this case starts out in one direction but gradually unfurls like a maze to become something entirely different, veering off in multiple directions and drawing the protagonists down a variety of obscure paths before they find the truth. It demonstrates how a mixture of great detective work, instinct and some pure luck can lead the police to the answer, and it may end up being more than one thing and very far from where they started. The plot is quite convoluted and complex, involving many different strands and characters, and the reader must focus to sort them out, mimicking the thought processes the police have to similarly go through to get there, but the writing is so accessible and flowing and the pace so quick that this is no chore.

Sam is a wonderful character, and she is the main draw for the books. She is small but feisty, brave, impetuous, honest but complicated, with a strong moral code and sense of loyalty. Some of her behaviour is totally outrageous, but she seems to get away with it because it comes from a positive place, a real desire to see natural justice served, which sometimes involves bending the rules. This does not always sit well with her boss, DI Johns, and the tension between the two of them plus throughout the text to add conflict. in addition, her personal life is no more straight forward, either with her blood family or in her romantic life. New developments add strain in this area, and things seem to be getting more complicated not simpler. There were certain matters in the book which were raised but not resolved, leaving me with theories about what might be coming in the next instalment, and eager to find out. However, do not fear, this book is perfectly concluded as a single story for readers who are not yet invested in this as a series, but i predict you will be once you sample Vanda’s writing.

The Sam Shepherd books are always a satisfying read, this one is no exception and I have added a physical copy to my collection. I eagerly await the next book in the series, and my next armchair visit to New Zealand.

Containment is available now and you can get your copy here.

Please make sure you check out the rest of the blogs taking part in the tour:

Containment BT Poster

About the Author

vanda_jacket_br-1

Vanda Symon is a crime writer, TV presenter and radio host from Dunedin, New Zealand, and the chair of the Otago Southland branch of the New Zealand Society of Authors. The Sam Shephard series has climbed to number one on the New Zealand bestseller list, and also been shortlisted for the Ngaio Marsh Award for best crime novel. She currently lives in Dunedin, with her husband and two sons.

Connect with Vanda:

Website: http://vandasymon.com/index.php

Facebook: Vanda Simon

Twitter: @vandasymon

Instagram: @vandasymon

random-thingstours-fb-header

Blog Tour: Deep Dark Night by Steph Broadribb #BookReview

Deep Dark Night final cover

Working off the books for FBI Special Agent Alex Monroe, Florida bounty hunter Lori Anderson and her partner, JT, head to Chicago. Their mission: to entrap the head of the Cabressa crime family. The bait: a priceless chess set that Cabressa is determined to add to his collection.

An exclusive high-stakes poker game is arranged in the penthouse suite of one of the city’s tallest buildings, with Lori holding the cards in an agreed arrangement to hand over the pieces, one by one. But, as night falls and the game plays out, stakes rise and tempers flare.

When a power failure plunges the city into darkness, the building goes into lockdown. But this isn’t an ordinary blackout, and the men around the poker table aren’t all who they say they are. Hostages are taken, old scores resurface and the players start to die.

And that’s just the beginning…

I’m so happy to be taking part in the blog tour today for Deep Dark Night by Steph Braodribb, the fourth book in the Lori Anderson series. If you missed my catch up of the first three books in the series, you can find that post here. My thanks to Anne Cater of Random Things Tours for inviting me to take part and to Karen Sullivan at Orenda Books for my digital copy of the book, which I have reviewed honestly and impartially.

Just when you think you know what to expect from a series, an author pulls something totally unexpected out of the bag and really shakes things up. Having binge read the first three books in the Lori Anderson series over the past few weeks, I thought had got into the rhythm of Steph Broadribb’s story-telling and then, boom, she has veered off on a totally unexpected and exciting new course with this latest instalment.

Firstly, we have moved away from the sunny settings of Florida and California for this book and are now visiting the lakeside northern city of Chicago, with its skyscrapers, wide, urban streets and the eerie wave-free lake beaches. It is a place I have visited twice and the writing immediately transplanted me from locked-down rural Yorkshire, back to the Windy City.

And, whilst we are back in the world of ruthless mobsters, shady FBI agents and bounty hunters, the author completely alters the feel and tone of the book from the previous novels where Lori was pursuing her prey across open vistas, by presenting us here with a locked room mystery. This time she finds herself trapped in a sealed penthouse with a group of dangerous men, with both time and air running out and a rush to find out who amongst the group is not what they seem before tensions spiral out of control.

Anyone who enjoyed the film, ‘Molly’s Game’ starring Jessica Chastain will immediately relate to the plot set up here, with a young woman hosting a high roller private poker game, but here the background to the contest is far from simple, and throughout the plot we find out, along with Lori, how all of the players are interconnected and what has lead to the situation they all find themselves in when the penthouse locks down.

Placing everyone into a confined space, with spiralling danger and increasing paranoia and rising stakes works brilliantly to crank up the tension to breaking point, in the characters and, consequently, in the reader. You can feel the temperature rising, muscles flexing, heart rates and stress increasing and anticipate the explosion that is imminent. It compels the reader to keep flying through the pages, to see how long it is going to take someone to break and what will be the outcome when it does.

I love the fact that Steph continues to give JT more of his own plot in this book, rather than just appearing as a sidekick to Lori. He is establishing himself in importance and relevance in the minds of the reader, just as he is in the lives and hearts of Lori and Dakota. Here, as in book two, when he and Lori are separated we get to see the action from their distinct viewpoints and it gives us an interesting dual perspective on the story. Seeing how JT reacts when Lori is in peril, and vice versa, allows the reader an intimate insight in to the dynamics of their relationship, which increases our investment in it and, consequently, the value of what is at stake for us as the risk for them increases. It gives the reader a fantastic pay off by the end of the book.

Every volume of this series has drawn me further in to Lori Anderson’s world and made me care more and more about what happens to her and her little family group. I think this was my favourite book yet, it had echoes of all the great mystery books I love, combined with the excitement of this unique thriller series. I really love these books, and I look forward to what is to come next. These books are so different to a lot of what I usually read, I really can’t get enough of them.

Deep Dark Night is out now and you can get your copy here.

Make sure you follow the rest of this extended blog tour for some great reviews and other content:

Deep Dark Night BT Poster

About the Author

Steph Broadribb Author Pic

Steph Broadribb was born in Birmingham and grew up in Buckinghamshire. Most of her working life has been spent between the UK and USA. As her alter- ego – Crime Thriller Girl – she indulges in her love of all things crime fiction by blogging at crimethrillergirl.com, where she interviews authors and reviews the latest releases. She is also a member of the crime-themed girl band The Splice Girls.

Steph is an alumni of the MA Creative Writing (Crime Fiction) at City University London, and she trained as a bounty hunter in California, which inspired her Lori Anderson thrillers. She lives in Buckinghamshire surrounded by horses, cows and chickens.

Her debut thriller, Deep Down Dead, was shortlisted for the Dead Good Reader Awards in two categories, and hit number one on the UK and AU kindle charts. My Little Eye, her first novel under her pseudonym, Stephanie Marland, was published by Trapeze Books in April 2018.

Connect with Steph:

Website: https://crimethrillergirl.com

Facebook: Crime Thriller Girl

Twitter: @crimethrillgirl

Backlist: Lori Anderson Series by Steph Broadribb #BookReview

BACKLIST

The third in my backlist series is catching up with the previous three books in the Lori Anderson series by Steph Broadribb before I take part in the blog tour for her new book, Deep, Dark Night. I’m really enjoying this binge-reading of the backlist titles in a series, it’s the literary equivalent of a consuming Netflix box set over a single weekend.

61VCwU98mUL._AC_UY218_ML3_

Lori Anderson is as tough as they come, managing to keep her career as a fearless Florida bounty hunter separate from her role as single mother to nine-year-old Dakota, who suffers from leukaemia.

But when the hospital bills start to rack up, she has no choice but to take her daughter along on a job that will make her a fast buck. And that’s when things start to go wrong. 

I listened to the first two of these novels on audio and this was a really great way to get to know the characters. The narrator, Jennifer Woodward, maintained a perfect Florida drawl for Lori throughout the book which brought the character sharply in to my mind’s eye. It made me realise that I never really read with the accent of the character in my mind when I read from text, and it gave the story an extra level of texture. I found myself hearing Lori talk in this voice throughout books three and four, despite the fact that I was reading rather than listening to them.

I’ve never read a book with a bounty hunter as the main character before, and a female one at that, so it was a delicious departure from the norm for me, and the book truly transported me to another world, as all really immersive novels should. I fell in love with Lori immediately, a tough, independent, determined woman, but we, the reader, also get to see her vulnerability with regards to her daughter, Dakota, and in her relationship with JT, as the book unfolds.

Having a bounty hunter, rather than a police officer, lawyer, detective or other member of the law-enforcement establishment, as the main character raises some interesting questions of where the moral lines sits between justice and revenge, where the line between good and bad blurs, and whether people can judge that for themselves according to their own moral code. Lori’s actions go beyond what you may perceive on paper as being truly law-abiding, but then you ask yourself what you would do in the same situation.

The book is packed front to back with drama, action and tension, as we criss cross the US from the mountains of West Virginia to the alligator-infested swamps of the Florida Everglades. It is a book that picks you up and runs with you from the opening pages, and doesn’t put you down until the last chapter. Even then, there is the tantalising prospect of the next case dropped in at the end, and you are left desperate to see where fate is going to take Lori next. A kinetic opening novel to a thrilling series.

Deep Down Dead is out now and you can get your copy here.

51ec4q5TBuL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_

Single-mother Florida bounty hunter Lori Anderson’s got an ocean of trouble on her hands. Her daughter Dakota is safe, but the little girl’s cancer is threatening a comeback, and Lori needs JT Dakota’s daddy and the man who taught Lori everything alive and kicking.

Problem is, he’s behind bars, and heading for death row. Desperate to save him, Lori does a deal, taking on off-the-books job from shady FBI agent Alex Monroe – bring back on-the-run felon, Gibson ‘The Fish’ Fletcher, and JT walks free. This is one job she’s got to get right, or she’ll lose everything…

So, we’re back with Lori and now she is faced with the reality of the love of her life in jail awaiting trial for murders he didn’t commit and at risk of facing the electric chair. Despite the ordeal she and her daughter, Dakota, have just faced in book one, Lori now has to leave Dakota behind and travel to San Diego on a mission for a dodgy FBI agent who has promised to arrange for JT to be exonerated if she brings in an escaped felon.

This novel adds a new dimension to the narrative by having us follow two timelines, one led by Lori and her attempts to track down the criminal in California, and the other charting the trials and hardships JT is suffering in jail. We also meet a new central character, a PI named Red who lives on a houseboat and has helped Lori in the past. I have to say, Red quickly became one of my favourite characters and I fell a tiny bit in love with him. If he were to be cast in a movie, he would be played by Sam Elliot, and I refuse to entertain any other suggestions.

2018-ja-samelliott-400x598

So, again, we have Lori dashing around in California, trying to track down the missing ‘bad guy,’ having to work as part of a team of other bounty hunters she doesn’t know that goes against her instincts. She is trying to work out who she can trust, who is on the make and whether the facts she has been given are the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. Of course, they aren’t, the lines between right and wrong, justice and injustice bleed in to one another. the right people don’t always end up winning and Lori is muddling through the best she can, relying on her own moral code and what is best for her daughter and her partner. You can’t help but get taken along as she battles the outside enemies, and the demons within, whilst only relying on her own skills, smarts and the three people in the world she knows she can trust.

The books are fast-paced and quite bloody, with lots of devious twists and turns of fate, and the author is really excellent at ramping up the peril. This book is mad, extreme entertainment, the equivalent of an action-movie in novel form and I raced to the end to find out if everyone I cared about made it out alive and free. Fantastic, adrenaline-fuelled excitement, perfect for getting your heart pumping while you sit on the couch.

If this review has tickled your fancy, you can get a copy of the book by following this link.

81FqChJLGDL._AC_UY218_ML3_

A price on her head. A secret worth dying for. 48 hours to expose the truth…

Single-mother bounty-hunter Lori Anderson finally has her family back together, but her new-found happiness is shattered when she’s snatched by the Miami Mob – and they want her dead. Rather than a bullet, they offer her a job: find the Mob’s ‘numbers man’ who’s in protective custody after being forced to turn federal witness against them. If Lori succeeds, they’ll wipe the slate clean and the price on her head – and those of her family – will be removed. If she fails, they die.

With North due in court in 48 hours, Lori sets off across Florida, racing against the clock to find him and save her family. Only in this race the prize is more deadly – and the secret she shares with JT more dangerous – than she ever could have imagined.

In this race only the winner gets out alive…

The author gets really ambitious in this book, when Lori gets blackmailed into doing a job for the head honcho of the Miami Mob, a man whose vendetta has been haunting her since the events of book one and who she needs to get off her back if she is ever going to manage a quiet life with JT and their daughter, Dakota. That possibility seems to get further and further away throughout the course of this novel, as Lori is once again separated from JT and her daughter, chasing down a mobster-turned-rat, with only 48 hours to find him.

Steph keeps finding ways to ramp up the stakes with every book, and finding new ways of testing Lori and her loyalties. She has to, once again, involve herself with Alex Munroe, the FBI agent who has his own agenda and whose motives she can never 100% trust. Again, nothing is as straight-forward as it seems and she has to evaluate whose side she is really on, whilst only truly being able to rely on herself to get everyone out of trouble.

This is a fantastic book for anyone who loves a gangster story, and there is the most marvellous battle towards the end that would grace the screen of any mob movie you ever saw. In fact, these books would make perfect films, I would definitely go and watch them (IF Sam Elliott is playing Red – see above – non-negotiable!) but, until that happens, the story completely comes alive on the page and is surely something you should all be reading to take your minds off the current situation we find ourselves in. Anything more completely unlike what you are currently experiencing locked in at home in the UK you’ll be hard-pushed to find, and it will sweep you out of reality for a little while, without requiring you to strain yourself, the author has done all the heavy lifting in the flow of the writing. I still find it hard to believe she is from Buckinghamshire!

Deep Dirty Truth is available now and you can get it in all formats here.

So, hopefully this has caught us all up to the current state of affairs with Lori Anderson and we are ready to hear what the latest book, Deep Dark Night, has to offer. Come back to the blog later today to see my review.

About the Author

Steph Broadribb Author Pic

Steph Broadribb was born in Birmingham and grew up in Buckinghamshire. Most of her working life has been spent between the UK and USA. As her alter- ego – Crime Thriller Girl – she indulges in her love of all things crime fiction by blogging at crimethrillergirl.com, where she interviews authors and reviews the latest releases. She is also a member of the crime-themed girl band The Splice Girls.

Steph is an alumni of the MA Creative Writing (Crime Fiction) at City University London, and she trained as a bounty hunter in California, which inspired her Lori Anderson thrillers. She lives in Buckinghamshire surrounded by horses, cows and chickens.

Her debut thriller, Deep Down Dead, was shortlisted for the Dead Good Reader Awards in two categories, and hit number one on the UK and AU kindle charts. My Little Eye, her first novel under her pseudonym, Stephanie Marland, was published by Trapeze Books in April 2018.

Connect with Steph:

Website: https://crimethrillergirl.com

Facebook: Crime Thriller Girl

Twitter: @crimethrillgirl