Blog Tour: Summer at the Highland Coral Beach by Kiley Dunbar #BookReview

Summer at the Highland Coral Beach

I’m so pleased to be taking my turn on the blog tour today for Summer at the Highland Coral Beach by Kiley Dunbar. Kiley is fast becoming one of my favourite authors and I could not wait to read her latest book. My thanks to Rachel Gilbey of Rachel’s Random Resources for inviting me to take part in the tour and to the publisher for my digital copy of the book, which I have reviewed honestly and impartially.

FINAL Summer at the Highland Coral Beach cover

Escape to the Highland Coral Beach – where broken hearts can be healed

Beatrice Halliday needs a break from life. Booking a trip to the Highlands on a whim, Beatrice hopes learning Gaelic in a beautiful Scottish village might help her heal her grief after losing her baby, her husband and her much loved job in a space of months.

But Port Willow Bay isn’t exactly as the website promised. Instead of learning a new language, she’s booked in to learn the ancient skill of willow weaving, her hotel room is Princess and the Pea themed (with a stack of mattresses for her bed!) and worse still, her tutor is Atholl Fergusson, grumpy landlord of the hotel where Beatrice is staying – and she’s the only one doing the course.

But as Beatrice finds herself falling in love with Port Willow Bay and its people, and as she discovers the kind heart beneath Atholl’s stony exterior, can she really leave?

At the very end of 2019, an author whose writing I had loved since I was in my teens very sadly passed away. That author was M. C. Beaton and the books beloved by me were the Hamish Macbeth stories. I spent many holidays in the Scottish borders as a child and in the town in which we stayed there was a newsagents, the Scottish version of W H Smiths, where I discovered the first Hamish Macbeth stories. I was in my early teens at the time and I immediately became addicted. As I am very old, this was in the days before Amazon, and I could not find these books in any local bookshops in the UK, so I used to wait eagerly for the summer holidays, saving up my pocket money, so I could rush and buy the next books in the series.

Several years later, the BBC made the Hamish Macbeth books into a delightful TV series, starring the gorgeous Robert Carlyle and set in a remote and dreamy part of the Scottish Highlands, and I was soon addicted to this too and still love it to this day.

Why is this in any way relevant to a review of the latest book by Kiley Dunbar, I hear you ask? Well, that TV series was filmed around the towns of Plockton and the Kyle of Lochalsh in the western Highlands, and this is a place I have been dreaming of ever since I first fell in love with these books and this show but I’ve never made it there, until now. Because Summer at the Highland Coral Beach is set in the fictional Highland village of Port Willow, which Kylie has based on that long-for destination of Plockton and the setting of the book is so gorgeous, so vivid, so…. touchable on the page that I feel like I’ve spent the last two days there, rather than stuck on my sofa at home. The book filled me with the same kind of joy and peace that made me fall in love with the portrayal of life in this small, remote Highland village and its eccentric characters in the M. C. Beaton books from my youth.

Anyone who read my reviews of Kylie’s previous two books will know I have waxed lyrical before about how wonderful her writing is at making a setting, location and a mood come alive on the page. It is a real gift, this ability to imbue the pages of a book with the spirit, the essence of a place so the reader is really there with the characters, in that place, at the time, and she really has it, possibly more than anyone I have read writing in this genre at the moment. If I really want to escape, these are the kind of books I want to pick up.

Setting aside, the characters in this book are just a delight, and I fell in love with the immediately. They are all warm and likeable and relatable from the off, and it doesn’t hurt that the main male protagonist is a hot Scot in a kilt. But it is the character of Beatrice that carries the book and made this particularly special and moving. For starters, the is in her late thirties, which is refreshing and relevant to us middle-aged readers, and she has been through something that is very moving and personal to me, because I have had a similar experience myself. I found the portrayal of Beatrice and her experience and the reaction to it very realistic and affecting, but it is written with love such and sensitivity and gentleness and understanding that, although it caused me to shed some tears and feel that little crack I forever carry in my heart give a shift, I also nodded along and smiled and acknowledged the truth of what was being shown in the story. This is a hard topic to write about, as well as to read, and it is done here with bravery and grace and I applaud the way it is handled. We must not be afraid to talk about these things, because they are the reality of people’s lives and should not be hidden and ignored.

I don’t want you to get the impression that this is a book full of sadness and pain, because it really isn’t. It is joyful and hopeful and truthful, full of warmth and sunshine and love and optimism. I adored all of the characters, the setting, the feeling of community and caring and family that flowed through it from first page to last. It was just what I needed to lift me at what is a dark time for a lot of people, and left me heart-warmed and cheered. Even in the darkest time, there is brightness and hope on the horizon. In fact, to steal a family motto from the book, ‘Dulcis Ex Asperis’. Let’s hope so.

Summer at the Highland Coral Beach is out now and you can buy a copy here.

Please do check out the other fantastic blogs taking part in the tour:

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About the Author

Kiley Dunbar author portrait

Kiley Dunbar is the author of heart-warming, escapist, romantic fiction set in beautiful places. Shortlisted for the Joan Hessayon Award for Debut Romantic Novelists 2019 for One Summer’s Night.

Kiley is Scottish and lives in England with her husband, two kids and Amos the Bedlington Terrier. She writes around her work at a University in the North of England where she lectures in English Literature and creative writing. She is proud to be a member of the Romantic Novelists’ Association and a graduate of their New Writers’ Scheme.

Connect with Kiley:

Facebook: Kiley Dunbar Author

Twitter: @KileyDunbar

 

Blog Tour: Tapestry by Beth Duke #BookReview

Tapestry Cover 1

Twenty-one-year-old Skye Willis lives in Eufaula, Alabama, a tourist mecca of stately homes and world-class bass fishing. Her childhood friends are either stuck at dead ends or have moved on to accomplish Big Things.

Skye’s grandmother, Verna, insists on being called “Sparrow” because she suspects her ancestors were Muscogee Creek. She dresses in faux deerskin and experiments with ancient Native American recipes, offering a myth or legend to anyone who will listen.

Skye has no idea what to do with her life. She’s smart as hell, but she has no faith or knowledge there’s something out there she was “born to do.” Nor does she know much of anything about her father, who died in Afghanistan when she was a toddler. He and his family are a mystery her mother won’t discuss. But when Sparrow sets out to confirm her Creek ancestry through genetic testing, Skye joins in. The results hit like a DNA bomb, launching them both on a path filled with surprises and life-changing events. Skye learns a harder truth than she ever expected.

Alternating chapters between Skye’s Alabama life and an intertwining tale of greed, deceit, and control in Texas, this story offers proof that all life is a woven tapestry of past, present, and future.

I am thrilled to be taking part today in the blog tour for Tapestry by Beth Duke. My thanks to Anne Cater of Random Things Tours for offering me a place on the tour and to the author for my copy of the book, which I have reviewed honestly and impartially.

This is a story about family, and what that means. Skye lives with her mother and grandmother in a small town in Alabama. Her mother has always been reluctant to talk about Skye’s father and this has left Skye feeling lost and unsure of her place in the world. At least, that is what she tells herself as an excuse for drifting through her life without making any decisions about her future. But does knowing where you come from really tell you who you are, and is blood what makes a family anyway?

Skye’s grandmother believes she has the blood of Native Americans flowing in her veins and that her ancestors are talking to her and guiding her  down the generations. Is she right, and does that sense of history, heritage and place make you more confident and secure in the world?

Skye’s mother, Lisa, has never been able to tell her daughter the truth about her father because she is ashamed, and the loss of the love of her life has left her unable to move on and accept the happiness that is being offered to her elsewhere. If she can forgive herself and allow herself to be happy, can she then open up and give her daughter the support and truth she thinks she needs?

This books explores themes of blood, heritage, family, understanding your place in the world and whether it is DNA or love that creates bonds between people. Through the trials and tribulations of three remarkable women, we explore what family really means and what we really need to know about ourselves to find peace and happiness. Some of the topics covered in this book are deeply personal to me, and I found the whole thing fascinating and profoundly moving. The author displays a deep understanding of the insecurities that can plague individuals and stop us from being the best versions of ourselves, until we are forced to confront them head on and deal with our deepest fears. I related on a fundamental level with a lot of what was discussed here.

There are some wonderful character studies in the book, particularly Sparrow, who was just a beautiful protagonist and one of those people who you remember long after the pages are closed. I wanted Skye throughout to realise that all she needed to do was look at her grandmother and mother for reassurance as to who she was and that there was no gap in her life that she needed a father figure to fill. Her progress towards this realisation, and the pain she feels along the way was genuine and frustrating, but a process a lot of people need to go through before they can accept that who they are is not defined by missing people, but by your own character and by the people who are there to love and nurture you in life, whether they are your blood family or not.

There is one character in the book who seemed to me a bit of a caricature, and I found the sub-plot of greed and power struggles less compelling than Skye’s personal journey, but I realise that aspect of the story was necessary to provide the contrast to Skye’s story arc, as another character comes to the same conclusions from the opposite direction. That being defined by looks, wealth and status are hollow markers because, once they are gone, there is nothing left to fall back on, so make your life choices wisely and be careful where you place your value.

This is all set against a rich and vividly-drawn backdrop of life in the South. As a lover of Southern-set novels, I basked in the warmth of the descriptions, tasted the flavours of the setting and enjoyed every second of it. The historical aspects that the author draws on to further enrich the story were fascinating, and made me want to go away and explore those details further.

This book has so much to offer that any reader endowed with curiosity and empathy will draw a huge amount of pleasure and satisfaction from it.

Tapestry is out now and you can buy a copy here.

Please do visit the rest of the marvellous blogs taking part in the tour for alternative opinions:

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About the Author

Beth Duke Author Picture

Beth Dial Duke is an Amazon #1 Best Selling author and the recipient of short story awards on two continents.
She is eyeing the other five.
Beth lives in the mountains of her native Alabama with her husband, one real dog, one ornamental dog, and a flock of fluffy pet chickens.
She loves reading, writing, and not arithmetic.
Baking is a hobby, with semi-pro cupcakes and amateur macarons a specialty.
And puns—the worse, the better.
Travel is her other favorite thing, along with joining book clubs for discussion. Please invite her to London…England or Kentucky, either is fine. Anywhere!

Connect with Beth:

Website: https://www.bethduke.com

Facebook: Beth Duke

Twitter: @bethidee

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Desert Island Books: Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood by Rebecca Wells

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When Siddalee Walker, oldest daughter of Vivi Abbott Walker, Ya-Ya extraordinaire, is interviewed in the New York Times about a hit play she’s directed, her mother gets described as a “tap-dancing child abuser.” Enraged, Vivi disowns Sidda.

Devastated, Sidda begs forgiveness, and postpones her upcoming wedding. All looks bleak until the Ya-Yas step in and convince Vivi to send Sidda a scrapbook of their girlhood mementos, called “Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood.”

As Sidda struggles to analyze her mother, she comes face to face with the tangled beauty of imperfect love, and the fact that forgiveness, more than understanding, is often what the heart longs for.

If you want to know if you are going to like this book or not, all you need to do is to read the prologue. It is only a page and a half long, but it perfectly encapsulates the setting, tone and characterisation of the book. It wraps you in the mood, sounds, tastes, smells and feelings of the Louisiana bayou and pulls you in to the book; a literary seductress of a prologue – I defy you to resist its siren call.

This is the third of the books I have chosen to accompany me to my Desert Island, to be read repeatedly in perpetuity and I had absolutely no doubt at all as to whether to include it in the list. I fell hopelessly and irrevocably in love with this book the first time I read it, and that love has remained unaltered – steadfast and true – through repeated readings over the intervening twenty-plus years. It is a book that has grown with me over that time, as I have matured from naive twenty-something to a woman in her mid-forties with now a history of relationships and children to inform my understanding of the book. It is a novel that gives you different things depending on from where in your life you come at it. A novel so rich in insight and understanding of the female condition that it will not age.

This book is, without doubt, the best book about female friendship that I have ever read, and given how much I read that is no minor feat. When I first read it in my early twenties, I was so moved by the depiction of the relationship between the four Ya-Yas, that I immediately bought a copy of the book for each of my three closest female friends, so I could share the experience with them, and I know I am not alone in feeling this. A whole movement of Ya-Ya clubs sprang up around this book as it moved readers to celebrate their own relationships with the women in their lives. Close female friendship is a unique and special thing, and Rebecca Wells portrays this perfectly. Just as in this book, my girlfriends have been there with me through all the important times in my life, good and bad. They have celebrated with me, commiserated, listened, advised, laughed and cried. At times they have literally carried me through periods when I thought I could not go on. They are always on my side, never judging, never criticising. They are the scaffolding that has kept me upright when my very foundations have been shaken by seismic life events, and this book dissects and celebrates the true bones of these relationships and their role in our lives.

As I’ve grown older and had relationships and family of my own, the dynamics of the mother/daughter relationship which is also central to this book have also come into sharper focus for me and meant more. I have come to understand it better from the perspective of Vivi, rather than Siddalee, and it has added an extra layer of richness to the narrative for me. There is always some new perspective to find on every reading, it is a book rich in nuance that takes more than one reading to mine and, as a result, I never get tired of it.

In addition to the above, this book also gives the most magnificent sense of place of any book I have read and was the reason that I fell in love with the Deep South of the USA before I even visited, and Louisiana in particular. I wanted to experience all the richness that this book promised awaited me there, the heavy warmth, the spice of the food, the twanging patois of the vernacular, so unique to this place and its mongrel history and when I finally got there, it exceeded every expectation. This book took part of my heart and planted it in Louisiana and the call to return and find it continues to draw me back to this day. This is an extraordinary feat for any book and reason enough to pick it up, if the preceding praise was not sufficient. If you want a book that transports you to a different time and place, look no further, this novel will carry you away; it is a book you can lose yourself in completely.

This book touches on some difficult subjects, but that is part of what makes it so glorious. This book is real. It deals with real people, real problems, real feelings, real relationships. The characters are flawed but compelling and the reader cannot help but be drawn into their drama. The writing is sublime. It is the kind of book that makes me want to write, to give people this experience, this connection with characters, this sense of empathy. When Rowan Coleman gave a talk at the RNA Conference last year about finding the three words to describe your writing, the top one on my list was affinity. I want people who read my book to feel an affinity with my characters and what they are going through, even if they have not been through the same experience themselves. That is what I feel for the characters in this book, even though they inhabit a different world than mine. And it makes me want to weep, because I know that I will never write anything as good as this.

If you haven’t got the message by now, I adore this book. It is one of those novels that, when you have read it, you feel that it has changed you.

You can get a copy of Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood here and I think I might have to insist that you do.

About the Author

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Rebecca Wells was born and raised in Alexandria, Louisiana. “I grew up,” she says, “in the fertile world of story-telling, filled with flamboyance, flirting, futility, and fear.” Surrounded by Louisiana raconteurs, a large extended family, and Our Lady of Prompt Succor’s Parish, Rebecca’s imagination was stimulated at every turn. Early on, she fell in love with thinking up and acting in plays for her siblings—the beginnings of her career as an actress and writer for the stage. She recalls her early influences as being the land around her, harvest times, craw-fishing in the bayou, practicing piano after school, dancing with her mother and brothers and sister, and the close relationship to her black “mother” who cleaned for the Wells household. She counts black music and culture from Louisiana as something that will stay in her body’s memory forever.

In high school, she read Walt Whitman’s “I Sing the Body Electric,” which opened her up to the idea that everything in life is a poem, and that, as she says, “We are not born separately from one another.” She also read “Howl,” Allen Ginsberg’s indictment of the strangling consumer-driven American culture he saw around him. Acting in school and summer youth theater productions freed Rebecca to step out of the social hierarchies of high school and into the joys of walking inside another character and living in another world.

The day after she graduated from high school, Rebecca left for Yellowstone National Park, where she worked as a waitress. It was an introduction to the natural glories of the park—mountains, waterfalls, hot springs, and geysers—as well as to the art of hitchhiking.

Rebecca graduated from Louisiana State University (LSU) in Baton Rouge, where she studied theater, English, and psychology. She performed in many college plays, but also stepped outside the theater department to become awakened to women’s politics. During this time she worked as a cocktail waitress–once accidentally kicking a man in the shins when he slipped a ten-dollar bill down the front of her dress—and began keeping a journal after reading Anais Nin, which she has done ever since.

Connect with Rebecca:

Website: https://www.rebeccawellsbooks.com

Facebook: Rebecca Wells Author

Twitter: @rwellswrites

Instagram: @mizrebeccawells

 

 

Blog Tour: Lemon Drizzle Mondays at the Little Duck Pond Cafe by Rosie Green #BookReview

Lemon Drizzle Mondays at the Little Duck Pond Cafe

I’m thrilled to be taking part today in the blog tour for the ninth book in this series, which I have been loving, Lemon Drizzle Mondays at the Little Duck Pond Cafe by Rosie Green. My thanks to Rachel Gilbey at Rachel’s Random Resources for inviting me to take part, and to the author for my copy of the book, which I have reviewed honestly and impartially.

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Molly Hooper has a secret. It haunts her dreams and casts a dark shadow over life with her gorgeous three-year-old daughter, Eva.

Arriving in Sunnybrook has given her a glimpse of sunshine. The Little Duck Pond Cafe crew seem so welcoming and there’s even the chance of a new job. Baking delicious cakes has always taken Molly to a happy place, so the job – at the glorious Brambleberry Manor Cafe – might just be perfect for her. It would mean she and little Eva could finally put down some roots at last.

But is Sunnybrook the sanctuary Molly is searching for? Or will the past come back to haunt her, wherever she hides?

I have read all eight books in the series up to this point and I actually think this one might be my favourite. I’ll try and explain why, if I can articulate it into words, although some of it has more to do with feeling than anything else.

This book gives us the story of Molly, who has been a minor character introduced in the last couple of books but is now getting a full novella revolving entirely around her and part of the reason this book is one of my favourites so far is that she is a character that your heart cannot help but go out to. Molly has made a series of ill-advised decisions in her life that have led her to end up in an awful situation that she cannot find her way out of and she believes that she is all alone in dealing with it. Her struggles have made her cut herself off from other people and emotions, so she is solely focused on protecting her young daughter, Eva.

Of course, she has ended up in Sunnybrook, home of the most well-meaning busybodies that ever existed (in a good way), and the troops soon rally round in the usual way to try and help Molly out. The thing that makes this book stand out is Molly’s situation brings in to sharp relief a very real and terrifying situation that is a all too true for too many people in our society today. I doubt many of them are as lucky as Molly is in finding a supportive community to help them out and it makes me very sad.

The author’s writing is always warm and friendly and enticing, and Sunnybrook is a consistently enticing place to revisit and fans of the series will find everything they love about the series here, as well as new things to enjoy. For anyone who has not read the previous books, this works very well as a standalone, but you should definitely go back and catch up on what has gone before, because the whole series is a delight. Bring on book ten!

(I really hope that soon I will be able to buy all of the series in paperback format, I’d love to add them to my shelf to return to in years to come when I am in need of a mood boost.)

Lemon Drizzle Mondays at the Little Duck Pond Cafe is out now and you can buy a copy here.

Please do make sure you check out the rest of the stops on the tour:

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About the Author

Rosie Green Author Pic

Rosie Green has been scribbling stories ever since she was little. Back then they were rip-roaring adventure tales with a young heroine in perilous danger of falling off a cliff or being tied up by ‘the baddies’. Thankfully, Rosie has moved on somewhat, and now much prefers to write romantic comedies that melt your heart and make you smile, with really not much perilous danger involved at all, unless you count the heroine losing her heart in love.

​Rosie’s brand new series of novellas is centred on life in a village café. The first two stories in the series are: Spring at The Little Duck Pond Cafe and Summer at The Little Duck Pond Café.

Connect with Rosie:

Twitter: @Rosie_Green1988

#Blog Blitz: The Faerie Tree by Jane Cable #BookReview

The Faerie Tree

I’m very pleased to be taking part in this blog blitz for a book I have had sitting on my TBR since last summer when I bought a copy at the RNA Conference and the author was kind enough to sign it for me. It has finally reached the top of the pile and I am indebted to Rachel Gilbey for inviting me to take part in the blitz. I have reviewed the book honestly and impartially. Make sure you check out the giveaway further down the post where you have the chance to win a copy of the book.

The Faerie Tree Cover

HOW CAN A MEMORY SO VIVID BE WRONG?

In the summer of 1986 Robin and Izzie hold hands under The Faerie Tree and wish for a future together. Within hours tragedy rips their dreams apart.

In the winter of 2006, each carrying their own burden of grief, they stumble back into each other’s lives and try to create a second chance. But why are their memories of 1986 so different? And which one of them is right?

I really did not know what to expect from this book, I wasn’t sure if it was going to be fantasy or magical realism, either of which I would have enjoyed, but it is neither. It is a surprising, powerful and emotional story of relationships, family, grief, loss and the way our minds react to trauma. I found the novel profoundly moving and was hooked from start to finish.

The author draws a trio of very strong and likeable characters in the novel, in Izzie and Robin, who tell the story in a dual narrative, and Izzie’s daughter, Claire, who is both an anchor and a catalyst in the tale. The story moves easily between Izzie and Robin’s recollection of events, and between current and historic happenings – it is incredibly well constructed. I thought the premise was fascinating and deftly explored, how reliable are our memories of events and how much does our psyche alter them to protect us from ordeals that we are not emotionally equipped to survive.

The Faerie Tree of the title is symbolic, and represents people’s hopes and dreams, a place where the protagonists come to reveal their innermost wishes, offload their concerns and voice their fears in the hope someone can hear them and help them process these desires. It then represents a place of blame and haunting, when those hopes and dreams are dashed and there is no one else to inculpate. It draws the focus of the family’s pain and becomes a way of them reaching out to it, and then each other, to share and understand and come together. I thought it was a really beautiful idea that was carried off without any mawkishness or sentimentality. The author explores the ideas of our connections to nature and spirituality through gratitude to the earth and its bounty, how this is important to some but misunderstood and ridiculed by others but, in the end, it is something that is likely to be fundamental to the survival of our species and our planet. Jane does this very cleverly and subtley, without any hint of preachiness, but I felt it through the narrative and it really resonated in present times.

The core of this story though, is love and relationships, how difficult they can be when people can’t make themselves understood by one another, or really understand themselves. In the end, success really comes down to openness, open-mindedness, trust and commitment. It feels to me a very true and very resonating story, and it left me warmed and thoughtful. It also contained some gorgeous pieces of description.

I really loved this book and I hope it finds its way to a large audience because it is a thoughtful, insightful and rewarding piece of work.

The Faerie Tree is out now and you can get a copy here.

Giveaway

If you would like to win paperback copies of The Faerie Tree and Jane’s first book, The Cheesemaker’s House, enter the giveaway by clicking on the Rafflecopter link below:

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*Terms and Conditions –UK entries welcome.  Please enter using the Rafflecopter box above.  The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then Rachel’s Random Resources reserves the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over.  Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for fulfilment of the prize, after which time Rachel’s Random Resources will delete the data.  I am not responsible for despatch or delivery of the prize.

Please make sure you follow the rest of the tour:

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About the Author

The Faerie Tree - Jane Cable 2019

Jane Cable writes romantic fiction with the over-riding theme that the past is never dead. She published her first two books independently (the multi award winning The Cheesemaker’s House and The Faerie Tree) and is now signed by Sapere Books. Two years ago she moved to Cornwall to concentrate on her writing full time, but struggles a little in such a beautiful location. Luckily she’s discovered the joys of the plot walk.

Connect with Jane:

Website: http://janecable.com

Facebook: Jane Cable

Twitter: @JaneCable

Her Husband’s Mistake by Sheila O’Flanagan – #BookReview #BlogTour

Her Husband's Mistakes PB Cover

Roxy’s marriage has always been rock solid.

After twenty years, and with two carefree kids, she and Dave are still the perfect couple.

Until the day she comes home unexpectedly, and finds Dave in bed with their attractive, single neighbour.

Suddenly Roxy isn’t sure about anything – her past, the business she’s taken over from her dad, or what her family’s future might be. She’s spent so long caring about everyone else that she’s forgotten what she actually wants. But something has changed. And Roxy has a decision to make.

Whether it’s with Dave, or without him, it’s time for Roxy to start living for herself…

I’m taking part in the paperback blog tour today for Her Husband’s Mistake by Sheila O’Flanagan. My thanks to Anne Cater of Random Things Tours for inviting me to take part and to the publisher for my copy of the book, which I have reviewed honestly and impartially.

This is my first book by Sheila O’Flanagan and I wasn’t quite sure what to expect but, having read it, I’m wondering why I haven’t discovered her books before.

This is completely the story of Roxy, a woman who married young and is a devoted wife and mother until her world is turned upside down by two events, the death of her beloved father and the almost simultaneous infidelity of her husband. These events make Roxy start to question her priorities and who she has been living for all these years and fundamentally alter the path of her life.

It is refreshing to read the story of a woman in her late thirties who is starting to question some of the norms that society sells women, the way it tries to pigeonhole us and keep us on socially acceptable pathways. As someone who went through a similar life upheaval in her late thirties (excluding the infidelity I must clarify!), I really related to Roxy and her questioning of what she personally wants as a woman and whether her life is giving her all of that. Women, especially mothers, are always expected to put themselves at the bottom of every heap and prioritise everyone ahead of themselves, which is fine to a degree where our children are concerned but there comes a point where we have to wonder if this is the best scenario for our mental health and personal happiness and wonder why we aren’t allowed to put some of our own needs on the table for consideration some times.

I raced through this book, the writing is pacy and easy to read, with a light tone despite the important subject matter. I was fully engrossed in the story, willing Roxy on in her quest to find what she actually wanted from her life and how to get balance between her obligations and her own needs. I was really rooting for her to make the right decisions, which were really clear to me from the start, and I was internally shouting at the book when it looked like she might be taking the wrong turn, and cheering when she came through. There was only one way this could end to be satisfying for me, because I has such strong antipathy for one of the characters, and luckily the author came to the same conclusion, but not without some tension along the way. An emotionally rewarding journey.

This is a domestic drama with strong relevance to the lives of modern middle-aged women, dealing with issues we all face in today’s world, where women are straining against some of the expectations and limitations that have been placed on them in the past. It deals with maternal guilt, which all of us who have children and careers will recognise, self-doubt, relationship problems, ageing parents and many other quandaries we all face on a daily basis. Anyone looking for an entertaining family drama with a strong streak of truthfulness running through it will enjoy this book.

Her Husband’s Mistake is out now in all formats and you can buy a copy here.

If you would like to visit some of the other blogs taking part in the tour, you can find details of the stops on the poster below:

Her Husband's Mistakes PB BT Poster

About the Author

Sheila O Flanagan Author pic

Sheila O’Flanagan is the author of many bestselling novels including The Hideaway, What Happened That Night, The Missing Wife, My Mother’s Secret, If You Were Me, and All For You (winner of the Irish Independent Popular Fiction Book of the Year Award). She lives in Dublin with her husband.

Connect with Sheila:

Website: https://www.sheilaoflanagan.com

Facebook: Sheila O’Flanagan

Twitter: @sheilaoflanagan

Instagram: @sheilaoflanagan

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A Winter Wedding at the Little Duck Pond Cafe by Rosie Green #BookReview #BlogTour (@Rosie_Green1988) #novella #LittleDuckPondCafe

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With Zak and Ellie’s wedding day approaching, there’s high excitement in the pretty village of Sunnybrook, especially among the Little Duck Pond Café crew. Ellie is over the moon with her romantic surprise wedding gift from Zak, and Madison is promising to organise a hen party to remember. Everyone has high hopes for a magical Christmas Eve wedding celebration at gorgeous Brambleberry Manor. (Even Maisie-Moo has a sparkling new outfit.)

But sometimes, even the best-laid plans can go wrong. And with the journey to the altar turning out to be rockier than expected, it’s going to take nothing short of a Christmas miracle to ensure a happy ending . . .

From the very early days of the blog, this is a series of novellas that I have been following and very much enjoying. I love the way the author has built on a set of three core characters, that we have come to know and love, and continued to tell us their stories, whilst at the same time, introducing new people to keep the series fresh and interesting.

In this eighth instalment of the series, we have reached the point where two of the characters from book one have finally reached their wedding day. Of course, in novels, the path of true love never runs smoothly and there are the inevitable hiccups on the way to the trip down the aisle and I really enjoyed following the last couple of weeks in the life of the couple leading up to their wedding. All my favourite characters put in an appearance, Maisie and Maisie-Moo are as cute as ever. There are some touching moments with Ellie and her mum, and Primrose gets to meet more of her extended family.

I also enjoyed catching up with what was going on with Fen and Jaz, and the newer character of Madison, who is a breath of fresh air in the series. A Christmas wedding is always a highlight of a book, and we also have the hen party and the festivities of the night before the wedding to enjoy. Bits of the book really made me laughs, and everything turns out for the best, as we’ve come to expect in Sunnybrook.

Am easy to read, heart-warming addition to the series and a lovely step along the road these characters are taking. I am looking forward to reviewing the newest story in the series soon, so make sure you check back because it is a goodie, one of my favourites so far.

A Winter Wedding at the Little Duck Pond Cafe is out now as an ebook and you can buy a copy here.

About the Author

Rosie Green Author Pic

Rosie Green has been scribbling stories ever since she was little. Back then they were rip-roaring adventure tales with a young heroine in perilous danger of falling off a cliff or being tied up by ‘the baddies’. Thankfully, Rosie has moved on somewhat, and now much prefers to write romantic comedies that melt your heart and make you smile, with really not much perilous danger involved at all, unless you count the heroine losing her heart in love.

​Rosie’s brand new series of novellas is centred on life in a village café. The first two stories in the series are: Spring at The Little Duck Pond Cafe and Summer at The Little Duck Pond Café.

Connect with Rosie:

Twitter: @Rosie_Green1988