Book Review: The Haunting of Lindy Pennyworth #BookReview

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Nobody believes Lindy when she says she doesn’t pull her hair out on purpose.

Nobody believes Lindy when she says she hears voices in the night.

Nobody believes Lindy when she says her dead ancestors are haunting her dreams.

Nobody believes Lindy …

After the death of her father, Lindy falls headlong into a state of grief and no longer understands her place in the world. Through paranormal rituals, Ouija boards and spiritualist churches, Lindy attempts to speak to her father beyond the grave – but to no avail. That is until she receives a ‘visit’ from Esme, her Victorian ancestor, who reveals that her family is under a curse that separates them in the afterlife.

Determined to break it, Lindy sacrifices her grip on reality. Not everyone wants her to succeed and there are secrets that fight to remain buried alongside the dead that she seeks . . .

I was provided with a copy of this book for the purposes of review by Graeme Williams of Graeme Williams Marketing, who has my grateful thanks. I have reviewed the book honestly and impartially.

We first meet Lindy when she is residing in a psychiatric ward, writing down her story so she doesn’t forget it while others try and convince her it is all a figment of her imagination so, from the very beginning, we are unsure whether Lindy is a reliable narrator or not and this sets the tone for the whole book. No one believes Lindy’s story, but are they right not to?

This is a YA book and it is part ghost story, part psychological thriller and had me on the edge of my seat throughout. Lindy has suffered a terrible loss and she is trying to make sense of things. Her mother isn’t a lot of help as she is dealing with the loss herself in ways that don’t make sense to Lindy. She doesn’t have many friends, and behind to indulge in some unhealthy behaviours which make people suspicious of her stability from the beginning. When she begins to try and explore the path of spiritualism, she puts herself on a slippery path, and is opening some dangerous doors.

The book is spooky, but not terrifying, so would be good for someone who likes to feel the frisson of fright but doesn’t like full-blown horror, or is in a slightly younger audience. That being said, it is definitely chilling, and some of the things that happen to Lindy are terrifying, if you put yourself in her shoes. As a fan of the show, Supernatural, this book was right up my street.

Lindy is a character easy to identify to, lost and confused as she is by her loss and still on that childhood/adulthood cusp where her mind is quite open. However, I also related quite a lot to Lindy’s mother, Caroline, who is struggling with both the loss of her husband and her daughter’s bizarre behaviour that she has no idea how to resolve. I can imagine how worrying the whole thing must be from her, and it would have been fascinating to see the story from her perspective too. I loved all the slow revelations that came out throughout the book about Lindy’s father and their relationship which move the story along.

This is a very satisfying read, and perfect for this time of year, which will appeal to both adults and older teenagers. I thought the story moved along at a satisfying pace, with plenty of action, intrigue and revelation to hold the readers interest, and an intriguing ending. I would have no hesitation in recommending this book to readers who enjoy a bit of a scary read during the autumn months.

The Haunting of Lindy Pennyworth is out now as an ebook and in paperback and you can buy a copy here.

About the Author

ME

S. M. Pope is a writer, editor, teacher and librarian based in Oxford, though she’s also lived in Canada (where she was born) and Spain. The Haunting of Lindy Pennyworth is her debut novel but she has had supernatural / horror short stories published before with Otranto House (Tales of the Supernatural), and one story, ‘La Tricoteuse’, won best ‘tale’ as part of a touring theatre production of A Tale of Two Cities. A more normal (ie not scary) story of hers was shortlisted by Trapeze Books and the single-parent-charity Gingerbread as part of their campaign to find a writer and story to represent single families. She enjoys spending time with her family, singing to her cats (should I admit that?), and laughing.

Connect with Sam:

Twitter: @childtastic

Instagram: @sampopewriter

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