The 2021 Romantic Novel Award Winners Interviews… with Catherine Tinley

Awards

This week I am chatting to the winner of the Goldsboro Books Historical Romantic Novel Award in the Romantic Novelists’ Association Awards 2021 for her novel Rags-to-Riches Wife, Catherine Tinley.

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Catherine, thank you very much for agreeing to appear on my blog today to celebrate the Romantic Novel Awards. You were obviously thrilled to win this award. What does it mean to you for your work to be recognised in this way and what benefits do you think it will bring to your career? Have they already started to manifest?

I was definitely thrilled! I honestly hadn’t expected it. I still think of myself as a newbie to the world of publishing – my next novel will be my seventh – so I have no idea what it might do for my career. It’s still a lovely experience though.

It was clear from your acceptance speech that the support of the RNA and other writers around you mean a lot to you. How does the support of other authors help you in your writing and what would your advice be to new writers starting out who are looking for a similar support network?

I get so much support through my networks of supportive writers. I wrote my first book solo, without any of those supports, so I know what it’s like. The RNA Irish Chapter is so positive, inclusive and supportive. I’m also part of the Unlaced historical romance group on facebook, and a community of women writers based in N Ireland called Women Aloud NI. All of these women support me and nudge me and inspire me. They generously share their knowledge and I try to do the same. There are similar groups everywhere if you look for them. . I’d say to any writer, look for your tribe.

Your publisher, Mills and Boon, must be thrilled to have two winners in this year’s awards and credit must go to them for spotting and nurturing such talent. What is the best thing about writing for Mills and Boon?

A few things come to mind. The sense of community among the Mills & Boon historical writers (again, mutual support). But there’s also the sense of Mills & Boon’s wonderful history and tradition. I read their books as a teenager and young adult, and many readers report that their mothers and grandmothers enjoyed Mills & Boons. Plus I love working with my editor, Julia Williams, who also edited Kate Hardy’s winning book.

What do you think awards like this do for the image of books in your genre, and the image of romance novels as whole, which sometimes are unfairly dismissed? What are readers who would not normally pick up a romance novel missing out on?

There is a certain snobbery about Mills & Boon, about romance, about women’s fiction generally. Yet many readers who wouldn’t normally consider choosing romance will happily watch a romantic comedy or ‘light’ film when they’re in the mood. There’s nothing wrong with happy endings – especially in today’s world. I think we all need to keep saying that.

Regency romance is becoming increasingly popular to readers as a genre, due in no small way I am sure to the Bridgerton effect. Have you always been a fan of Regency novels? What do you particularly love about them?

I think what’s so lovely about Regencies is that readers come to know and understand the ‘rules’ and expectations of the Regency fiction world. It’s like a fantasy world that you know really, really well. We often talk about ‘Planet Regency’ which has its own conventions, tropes, and rules – some of which are more historically accurate than others. As a writer, it’s fun to explore what is possible within the preset tramlines. I’m currently working on a romance set in the Outer Hebrides in 1810 – it basically mixes Regency and Highlander tropes. And there’s so much scope to play with using the regency setting. I’ve explored #MeToo themes, and general themes of women’s choices and women’s freedom throughout my books.

Themes of class distinction are recurrent in Regency novels and this is something you explore in Rags-to-Riches Wife. Is this something that particularly interests you? How do you think you may have fared in the Regency period?

Even though Planet Regency is a fantasy world where we can be whomever we want to be, I can’t forget that my own ancestors would have been farmers, tradespeople, or servants. So I do enjoy writing books that explore the role of women, and the expectations and pressures on women, during that period in history. I actually think women often had more choices, and more autonomy, if they were middle class rather than aristocrats, although women in general had few legal rights. Despite this, I like to think women often would have found ways to influence their own lives – including their choice of a husband. Jane is an unusual heroine I suppose – a Cinderella who isn’t sure she wants to leave her life as a servant, and I loved exploring the class issues through her eyes.

Mills and Boon authors generally seem to be prolific writers, a skill I am in awe of as I struggle on to finish my first novel. What is next in the pipeline for you? How do you manage your workload and do you have any tips for me and other new romance writers?

I hear you! It’s so hard to get into the writing groove and write consistently over time. I work full-time in the NHS so can only write at weekends or during holidays. I do try to write 2k words each writing day, and try not to stop till I’ve reached that target. I also find that when I’m stuck or in a block, it’s usually best to write through it. Having said that I find there are periods when I just get out of the routine of writing and it is so hard to get the regular habit going again. Good luck with your own book, and thank you for having me today!

It’s been my huge pleasure.

Catherine’s award-winning novel, Rags-to-Riches Wife is available here.

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Lady’s maid…

To wedded Lady?

Lady’s maid Jane Bailey’s life is turned upside down by the arrival of wealthy gentleman Robert Kendal. He’s come to take Jane to visit her long-lost, aristocratic grandfather. Travelling together, they succumb to a mutual attraction. Yet Jane knows a maid should not hope to love a gentleman, even if she’s suddenly wearing silk dresses and dining with the Family. Society decrees they cannot marry, but how long can Jane deny her heart?

About the Author

Catherine Tinley is an award winning author of historical romance. She writes witty, heartwarming Regency love stories for Harlequin Mills & Boon. She has loved reading and writing since childhood, and has a particular fondness for love, romance, and happy endings. After a career encompassing speech & language therapy, Sure Start, maternity campaigning and being President of a charity, she now manages a maternity hospital. She lives in Ireland with her husband, children, cats, and dog.

Connect with Catherine:

Website: https://catherinetinley.com/

Facebook: Catherine Tinley 

Twitter: @CatherineTinley

Instagram: @catherinetinleywriter

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