Desert Island Books with… Eden Gruger

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It’s time to strand another willing victim on my literary tropical island with five books of their choosing to keep them company until rescue arrives, plus one luxury item (which cannot be any kind of human or animal companion, or a rescue or escape device). Today’s castaway is author… Eden Gruger

Book One – The Crimson Petal and the White by Michel Faber

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Sugar, an alluring, nineteen-year-old whore in the brothel of the terrifying Mrs Castaway, yearns for a better life and her ascent through the strata of 1870’s London society offers us intimacy with a host of loveable, maddening and superbly realised characters.

Gripping from the first page, this immense novel is an intoxicating and deeply satisfying read, not only a wonderful story but the creation of an entire, extraordinary world.

I am currently re-reading The Crimson Petal and the White by Michel Faber, the story set in 1875 centres around William Rackham, his wife Agnes and the prostitute Sugar. The characters are so layered, and we get to see the thoughts and motivations behind what they show the world. New things reveal themselves every time I read it. The other thing it has in its favour is that it’s such a large book that it would double up as a step for me to reach higher than I would be able to, so that’s a win win.

Book Two – The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett

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After the sudden death of her wealthy parents, spoilt Mary Lennox is sent from India to live with her uncle in the austere Misselthwaite Manor on the Yorkshire Moors. Neglected and uncherished, she is horribly lonely, until one day she discovers a walled garden in the grounds that has been kept locked for years.

When Mary finds the key to the garden and shares it with two unlikely companions, she opens up a world of hope, and as the garden blooms, Mary and her friends begin to find a new joy in life.

Having first read The Secret Garden as a young child it’s been special to me for decades; I have a friendly robin who visits me in my garden (he is so friendly he flies into the house and sits on my laptop). When I talk to my Robin, I always think about Ben the gardener being visited by his Robin. And the idea of turning a derelict garden into a paradise is something that really inspires me. Whether my love of gardening came from this book, or vice versa I’m not sure. The themes of the book and they resonated with my own life, so that’s a whole other aspect to ponder on the desert island, I’m sure that it will inspire me to see what I can grow.

Book Three – Attention All Shipping by Charlie Connell 

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This solemn, rhythmic intonation of the shipping forecast on BBC radio is as familiar as the sound of Big Ben chiming the hour. Since its first broadcast in the 1920s it has inspired poems, songs and novels in addition to its intended objective of warning generations of seafarers of impending storms and gales.

Sitting at home listening to the shipping forecast can be a cosily reassuring experience. There’s no danger of a westerly gale eight, veering southwesterly increasing nine later (visibility poor) gusting through your average suburban living room, blowing the Sunday papers all over the place and startling the cat.

Yet familiar though the sea areas are by name, few people give much thought to where they are or what they contain. In ATTENTION ALL SHIPPING, Charlie Connelly wittily explores the places behind the voice, those mysterious regions whose names seem often to bear no relation to conventional geography. Armchair travel will never be the same again.

I used to listen to the Shipping Forecast on the radio while tucked up safe in bed, and always thought about being all cosy whilst the people the programme was aimed at were listening out at a sometimes very stormy sea. Then I heard about book were Charlie Connelly visits all the places on the forecast, I just love how Charlie brings these places to life for the reader, and I think reading this on the island would be like taking a holiday.

Book Four – Homesick: Why I Live in a Shed by Catrina Davis

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Aged thirty-one, Catrina Davies was renting a box-room in a house in Bristol, which she shared with four other adults and a child. Working several jobs and never knowing if she could make the rent, she felt like she was breaking apart.

Homesick for the landscape of her childhood, in the far west of Cornwall, Catrina decides to give up the box-room and face her demons. As a child, she saw her family and their security torn apart; now, she resolves to make a tiny, dilapidated shed a home of her own.

With the freedom to write, surf and make music, Catrina rebuilds the shed and, piece by piece, her own sense of self. On the border of civilisation and wilderness, between the woods and the sea, she discovers the true value of home, while trying to find her place in a fragile natural world.

This is the story of a personal housing crisis and a country-wide one, grappling with class, economics, mental health and nature. It shows how housing can trap us or set us free, and what it means to feel at home.

Homesick: Why I Live in a Shed would be a great choice for me to read while I was living on the island. Being the author’s story of being homeless, and the solution she found for it. I only read this book relatively recently, but I’ve been recommending it to everyone, and I feel sure that Catrina’s story would be inspiring me while I was on the island about making the best of it    

Book Five – Confessions of a Bookseller by Shaun Bythell

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“Do you have a list of your books, or do I just have to stare at them?”

Shaun Bythell is the owner of The Bookshop in Wigtown, Scotland. With more than a mile of shelving, real log fires in the shop and the sea lapping nearby, the shop should be an idyll for bookworms.

Unfortunately, Shaun also has to contend with bizarre requests from people who don’t understand what a shop is, home invasions during the Wigtown Book Festival and Granny, his neurotic Italian assistant who likes digging for river mud to make poultices.

The Diary of a Bookseller (soon to be a major TV series) introduced us to the joys and frustrations of life lived in books. Sardonic and sympathetic in equal measure, Confessions of a Bookseller will reunite readers with the characters they’ve come to know and love.

When I was at school and thought that I would never be able to become an author it was my hope to become a librarian or work in a bookshop. Having not done either of those things Shaun Bythell’s book Confessions of a Bookseller allows me to have the experience of being a second hand bookseller without all the hassles, and the risk of financial ruin! I love the characters who work in the shop, the customers and the background stories of the book collectors and collections that he buys just make me want to find a second hand bookshop and have a good old rummage. So that would bring back lots of happy memories of before I was on the island.  

My luxury item

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As I’ve been told that I cannot take my dog or a radio with me this has been a tricky one, as I cannot imagine my life without either. So, I think I will have a massive roll of gaffer tape. I saw an episode of Naked and Afraid (a show I love) where a guy took in a roll of tape and used it to make a bowl to eat and drink from, clothing, and he even stuck his shelter together and wove a blanket from it. Although I know that my husband would say take a fire lighter.

About the Author

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Eden Gruger lives with her second husband, one big dog, one small, and a part time cat who lives life on her own terms. Eden writes about the ups and downs in women’s lives in the humorous candid occasionally tragic way that women might speak to their closest girlfriends. Eden is one of those crumb magnet women, you know the sort who when they eat a pastry, they end up with more crumbs on them than in them, the person who accidentally says the wrong things, at the wrong time, to the wrong people, or trips over. Other than writing her passions are to highlight invisible disability, and to help other women share their voice through publishing and market their own books.

Eden’s second book Laughing at Myself is a collection of stories based on events in Eden’s own life, told in her own humorous, candid, and uniquely witty style. With stories such as wheel of (mis)fortune, Cataracts Toilet, and Death by Frisbee this book will make you laugh and give a sign of relief that you aren’t the clumsiest and scattiest person in the world after all. You can buy a copy here.

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Laughing at Myself is a collection of stories based on events in Eden’s own life, and given her humorous, candid, witty twist.

With stories such as Wheel of (Mis)fortune, Cataracts Toilet, Death by Frisbee and How to Take Your Driving Test, this book will make you laugh, and give a sigh of relief that you aren’t the clumsiest and scattiest person in the world after all.

 

Connect with Eden:

Website: https://edengrugerwriter.online/

Facebook: Eden Gruger The Author

Twitter: @edengrugerwrit1

Instagram: @eden_gruger_author

Pinterest: Eden Gruger

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